Steve Cooper

Steve Cooper is Police Hour's in house promotional coach who supports police officers who aspire to promotion to the rank of sergeant and inspector to achieve their goals. As a qualified management coach and leadership mentor I do that by asking questions and offering suggestions to identify gaps, to focus and direct effort and to maximise the potential of each individual. Some smart hard work is also required to prepare effectively! Steve joined the Police Hour team in 2017 and brings a wealth of value to our readers in terms of free police promotion content.

There’s a First Time For Everything 

Launching yourself into a police promotion process can be a challenging mission.

Astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first person to walk on the moon said something quite striking when he was asked what it felt like. His response was this: “It felt like I had been there a thousand times before”.

That’s a powerful indication of the link between solid preparations and successful completion of the mission.

Deliver, Support and Inspire

President John F. Kennedy’s speech ‘Lets go to the moon’

In 1962 was incredibly inspiring, paving the way for NASA and the moon landings with a statement of massive human ambition. I’ve paraphrased it below; to reflect the ambition, drive and energy you’ll need just to achieve lift off towards reaching your goal.

“I choose to seek promotion and develop myself in the process, not because it is easy, but because it is hard; because that goal will serve to organise and measure the best of my energies and skills, because the challenge is one I am willing to accept, unwilling to postpone, and one I intend to win.” Houston, we have a solution.

First Things First

“A little knowledge that acts is worth infinitely more than the knowledge that is idle” – Khalil Gibran

I want you to pass your police promotion board the first time. But there are no guarantees. None whatsoever.

Zilch.

Carpe Diem

“Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work.” – Thomas Edison

Underestimate time it takes to transform to match fit candidate 

In my experience, many aspiring police leaders simply underestimate the time it takes to transform from good operational cop into a ‘match fit’ promotion candidate. For some, it’s a conscious choice to delay and put off preparation.

Others gamble with their chance.

Whichever way you look at it, it’s an opportunity missed.

And it happens, with vast cohorts, every year.

For those who do seize the day, there’s a direct correlation with first-time promotion success. Says who? Says me.

Often many people are kind enough to update me on the outcome of their promotion processes i’d like to take the opportunity to share some insights with you that describe from the different perspectives, the benefits of effective preparation which have contributed directly to first-time successes.

Providing you insights into the common challenges individuals face within their promotion aspirations. This can inspire confidence in others facing the same challenges, knowing they can be overcome.

Work Smart

“Stars do not pull each other down to be more visible; they shine brighter.” – Matshona Dhliwayo

Some examples of how you can work smart are:

Focusing on key areas where you will be assessed, Understanding how your promotion evidence aligns to the competency framework and Becoming comfortable talking about the dimensions and functions of the role you are applying for.

Working Hard 

Unsuccessful candidates who have worked hard have not passed the police promotion selection progress, Anyone can work hard and lots of candidates who have worked hard have been unsuccessful.

Lay the Foundations

“It’s not the will to win, it’s the will to prepare to win that is important” – Bobby Knight

Without high levels of self-motivation, you are unlikely to excel in your promotion board and that’s what we are talking about here. That kind of performance is built on solid foundations, for which background reading helps tremendously.

That doesn’t mean ploughing through all your force’s policies; a quest many candidates often set off on. For example, your interview panel (who are scoring you), are unlikely to be aware of such policies in the first place! It does mean a material that triggers, supports and challenges your thinking while being entirely relevant to you being promoted.

Gain ‘An Edge’

“Sure pays to have an edge” – Josey Wales

You can give yourself an edge. It’s in your power. You can start moving forward now by taking action now.

Choosing to take control right now as you read these words can improve your chance of a successful outcome. Of course, you can also choose otherwise, as many (mainly unsuccessful) candidates do.

What Success Looks Like

“Success comes from knowing that you did your best to become the best that you are capable of becoming.” – John Wooden

Starting with the end in mind is a sound approach. Set the bar high for yourself from today. Ask yourself, what does success look like?

The following are the kind of questions I might ask Police Officers during a coaching session.

What kind of promotion board do you want?
What do you want the panel to think about you afterwards?
What needs to happen for that to be the case?

Of course, you can now use them as part of your approach!

Let us know your views by tweeting @PoliceHour We'll feature the best tweets within the article.

Promotion: Your Mission Should You Choose To Accept It

Promotion Interviews: Mission Impossible?

 “Mr Hunt, this isn’t mission difficult, it’s mission impossible” – Commander Swanbeck

You are to appear before a panel. Your mission should you choose to accept it, is to identify, secure and assimilate critically important information to respond effectively to their questions. Your actions from today are vital to equipping yourself with the knowledge, skills and attributes you will require. That is all. Good luck.

 Ok, as you’ve probably guessed, I recently went to see Mission Impossible – Fallout, at the cinema.

 It’s as good as all the hype too. Here’s a taster:

Identify and Secure Intelligence

“Intelligence or the lack of it determines the probability of success” – Sun Tsu

 Gathering, verifying and assessing facts and information is the first step in the decision-making process and identifying operational threats and risks. Asking questions to do that are key. Good leaders don’t have all the answers but do ask great questions.

 What do you know? What do you need to know? Where and how will you get the information required?

 Here’s another: “What kind of promotion interview will you face?”

 As a coach/mentor, I’ll often ask candidates this question because responses can be revealing. A tremendous amount of uncertainty around this topic is not uncommon. Many candidates unwittingly ignore or overlook existing open source intelligence.

“You don’t understand what you are involved in” – Ilsa Faust (MI6)

“I don’t know” is a common reply. And that’s ok because it’s a great place to start.

 As a leader, manager and supervisor you won’t always have all the facts and it’s a helpful question to identify knowledge gaps, raise awareness and to build confidence. Being comfortable with uncertainty is also an expectation for leadership development given today’s vortex of change.

 When asked in the film how he was going to solve the problem at hand, agent Hunt replies:

 “I’ll figure it out.”

 Adopting an intelligence-based approach is a tried and tested method to help you figure out how to perform well in your force selection process – and accomplish your mission of securing promotion.

There are a variety of knowns and unknowns involved and many individuals are simply unaware that a great deal of useful information is freely available, hidden in plain sight! I encourage officers to build and develop an intelligence picture of what is known.

“Maybe it’s hard to see what’s right in front of you while you’re frantically searching for it” – Susane Colisanti

 Actionable Information 

“Information about the package is as important as the package itself” – Frederick W. Smith

* * * Impossible Missions Force (IMF): 13 Point Intelligence Report  * * *

  • You will face a competency interview. This is also known as a structured or behavioural interview.

  • You need to understand this because it means you will be asked questions in a certain way.

  • In means also that any answers you provide should be structured. This will help you to score. Different structures exist. You need to choose one you feel comfortable with.

  • Any selection test for promotion including this interview will be assessed against a competency framework.

  • Different competencies may be tested more than once during a selection process, so develop your understanding of the assessment framework. You’ll be operating blind if you don’t.

  • You will be asked six to eight questions. Some will be forward facing questions. Others will be rear facing.

  • You’ll have between 45 minutes and 60 minutes to persuade and influence the panel that you can do the job.
  • Make it easy for them to choose you. Be so good they can’t ignore you.

  • All agents should know. Those days of ‘winging it’ or flying by the seat of your pants – are long gone.

  • Prevailing in this situation is likely to be underpinned by your ability to talk comfortably about the role; the challenges you’ll face and how you believe you can meet them.

  • A demonstrable understanding of vision, mission and shared values are important.

  • The depth and breadth of your preparation will be apparent to those charged with making the decision to promote you.

  • The panel’s role is to promote the best available people. Start now.

***This report will self-destruct in five seconds ***

 Once you’ve acquired timely, accurate and actionable information as outlined above you’ll need to increase your focus, up your energy and activity levels to make full use of it.

Making the jump from where you are to where you want to be, requires an effective plan and action! A digital Toolkit could help you leap to another level. Heightening awareness as you get nearer to the prize can be a nail-biting experience. You may need to fight harder, change gear or increase your speed.  

“Phoenix, I have eye on the prize. Do you copy?” – Ethan Hunt

 Achieving promotion can sometimes seem like Mission Impossible. However, hundreds of officers are taking covert action using open source information, which enables them to report back successfully:  “Mission accomplished”.

Let us know your views by tweeting @PoliceHour We'll feature the best tweets within the article.

Be So Good They Can’t Ignore You

A determined Sergeant inspired me to write this blog. He first made contact with me because he had been unsuccessful in previous attempts at promotion to Inspector in his own force. I’ll come back to this later…

There’s no easy route to acquiring or developing good interview skills. It takes time, perseverance and commitment. The good news is that you can massively enhance your chances of success with some smart working. Because of the promotion processes are a competition, it means you must become the best version of you.

A strong performance in your promotion interview is likely to be underpinned by your ability to talk comfortably: Talking about the role you aspire to, your workforce mission, vision and shared values; together with enthusiasm and a clear idea of what you will do with your new stripes or pips going forward.

 Begin With the End in Mind

 “Visualise this thing that you want, see it, feel it, believe in it. Make your mental blue print, and begin to build.” – Robert Collier

To make it easy for the panel to pick you from others, aim to be so good that they can’t ignore you. This is in your power. Take a few moments to visualise your promotion interview. Ask yourself these questions and write down your responses.

  1. What impression do I want to leave the panel with when I leave the room?
  2. What do I want them to think?
  3. What needs to happen for that to be the case?

Visualising success ahead of your promotion opportunity helps lay a mental foundation for managing your interview responses. Thinking through potential questions and responses develops self-awareness and incrementally builds your personal confidence. However, it’s not a one-off. You need to work at this over time.

 Your Attitude

“You have to apply yourself each day to becoming a little better. By applying yourself to the task of becoming a little better each day and every day over a period of time, you will become a lot better” – John Wooden

Your attitude is a hypothetical construct that represents your degree of like or dislike for something. It is your ‘state of readiness’ to respond in a characteristic way to a concept or situation. It is the dynamic element in your behaviour, the motive (reason) for activity e.g. Why are you doing this?

The good news is that your attitude is a choice. It can be changed through persuasion. It is generally a positive or negative view of a thing or event. Always remember that you are free to choose your attitude.

“The last of human freedoms is the power to choose one’s attitude to a given set of circumstances” – Victor Frankl

What attitude have you chosen?

 Growth Mindset

 “When the world says give up,hope whispers, tryone more time.” – Unknown

Have a look at the differences between fixed and growth mindsets, as described by the psychologist Carol Dweck.

The following also lays the concept out nicely in a graphic designed by the theorist Nigel Holmes.

Dweck states that a passion for stretching yourself and sticking to it, even when it is not going well, is the hallmark of the growth mindset. Individuals with the growth mindset find success in doing their best, in learning and improving.

What do you recognise in your own mindset?

A Triple Whammy…

“Some people don’t like competition because it makes them work harder, better” – Drew Carey

Aspiring officers who have previously experienced failure often contact me. As a coach/mentor, I believe in the potential of every individual.

I mentioned earlier that I had been inspired to write this blog by a Sergeant, who had been unsuccessful in promotion selection processes in his force. We spoke on the phone and it was clear that he still possessed a positive attitude.

Although he was disappointed by previous setbacks, his growth mindset, self-belief and reserves of resilience were all factors that made him want to try again. But this time he decided to approach things slightly differently. I’ll let him tell the story:

“I applied for promotion three times with my force and was unsuccessful each time. From wanting to give up and thinking it may not be for me, I attended the Rank Success promotion Masterclass, where I got to grip with how and what I needed to do. I tried one final time applying for mutiple advertised Inspector vacancies in three different forces. Every force had different application processes (A “Why Me & Why Now” Letter, an online application and a standard application).

“I was successful in all three paper sifts that followed and was invited to interviews/assessment centres. Rank Success eBooks helped me prepare for my presentations, briefings and formal interviews.”

I went from 3 Failures to 3 Passes!

“I passed all three-promotion boards with flying colours coming top in two processes. A choice of three forces! I wish I could take all the positions offered but have to decide where is my career best suited!”  –

Deepak recently (Passed THREE Inspectors processes at once!)

What happened for this to be the outcome?

When you begin with the end in mind,‘ Be so good they can’t ignore you, becomes a mindset. It raises the bar from day one. I encourage all my clients to aim that high.

Successful candidates often tell me that they put more effort, time and commitment into preparing for their interview than anything they have ever prepared for before. As a result, they feel more aware and confident. It’s that simple, and it’s that hard!

Ask yourself  How much do I want to succeed?

Am I prepared to do the necessary work to perform to the best of my ability when it matters?

Life is a series of choices. You can choose your mindset. You can choose to start now.

Wherever you are on your promotion journey, Rank Success can help you prepare effectively. Why not download a FREE guide & start today?

Let us know your views by tweeting @PoliceHour We'll feature the best tweets within the article.

If You Don’t Believe in Yourself, Why Should Anyone Else?

 “Your success depends mainly on what you think of yourself and whether you believe in yourself  William J. H. Boetcker 

 Our relationships, abilities and possibilities are influenced by our beliefs about them. These beliefs can be empowering but amongst them we all have some limiting beliefs and thoughts. 

 These are the powerful thoughts that limit action, that stop you moving forward. Some are as a result of social conditioning, often from childhood and act as your very own filter of reality, affecting how you see and experience the world. These limiting or negative beliefs are also invisible. They hold you back from achieving your true potential. 

 As the owner of these thoughts and beliefs you can choose to get rid of them. You can do this through raising your awareness and prove them false. Sometimes described as stinking thinking, here are some examples. 

  • All the wrong people get promoted

  • It’s a waste of time

  • I don’t have enough experience

  • It’s not a fair process

  • There’s no point in me applying

  • I’m too old

  • Others have a better chance than me

  • I’m not good enough

  • I’m too young

  • I don’t have the time

  • There are no opportunities

 You can identify and acknowledge your self-limiting or negative beliefsBeing completely honest with yourself is a starting point. Everyone has them. At least one! 

 Write them down. Make them visible.

Out In The Open

“Positive thinking won’t let you do anything, but it will let you do everything better than negative thinking will” Zig Ziglar

Once they are out in the open, one way of dealing with these thoughts is to reframe them. Reframing is a technique for altering negative or self-defeating thought patterns by deliberately replacing them with positive conscious self-talk. It’s about changing your perception and generating new options.  

For example: “I don’t have enough time” when reframed becomes “I prioritise things that are important to me”.

Here are some more:

A Thinking Partner

“Our thoughts are shaped by our assumptions and sometimes those assumptions are just plain wrong” Cara Stein

Coaches are sometimes described as a thinking partner. Supporting and respectfully challenging the thinking of individuals who aspire to promotion is something that I love doing.

Identifying stinking thinking and then reframing it helps with getting the approach right going forward. It’s a valuable tactic and one that can help build confidence.

I hear lots of aspiring promotion candidates using the term ‘if I’m successful” when talking about opportunities ahead. That’s some stinking thinking right there!  It’s a subconscious barrier. It reflects inner doubt, lack of self-belief and can prevent you from presenting the best version of yourself during a promotion selection process.

Reframing can be a powerful enabler.  Here’s a brief insight from Steve, a Detective Sergeant, prior to successfully achieving his goal of promotion to Inspector:

“The positive mind set you kept me in was very good for me…You often corrected me from saying ‘if’ I pass to ‘when’ I pass, which had an impact psychologically on my preparation and actually made me feel you were keeping me on track. Compared to a previous unsuccessful interview, I felt completely different and more relaxed. Where I was unsure… a quick chat put me back in the positive thinking area again. There were a few times you did that”

Reframing “if” (stinking thinking) to “when” (positive thinking) helps tremendously in visualising a successful outcome. As Henry Ford puts it: 

“If you think you can or if you think you can’t, you’re right”

Finally, if you are preparing ahead and would like something to trigger and support your thinking, here’s a FREE 50 page downloadable guide: ‘7 Things Promotion Boards Also Look For’

Let us know your views by tweeting @PoliceHour We'll feature the best tweets within the article.

Police Promotion Long Live The CVF

The phrase: ‘The King is dead. Long live the King’, refers to the heir who immediately succeeds to the throne. It arose from the law of ‘le mort saisit le vif’, meaning that the transfer of sovereignty occurs instantaneously upon the moment of the death or the previous monarch.

As of April 2018, the College of Policing (CoP) ended its support for the Policing Professional Framework (PPF) personal-qualities based police promotion. There has been no coronation as such, yet in the world of police promotion processes, there has been a succession. A new monarch, the ‘CVF’, or Competency and Values Framework to announce its full title has arrived. If you aspire to promotion now or in future, CVF the new monarch requires your allegiance!

A Level Playing Field

“Success in any field begins by deciding exactly what you want, then developing a plan” – Anon

Despite the well-documented challenges facing the police service, there are clearly a significant number of highly motivated aspiring leaders: Thousands of officers are awaiting the result of the NPPF Sergeant’s exam as I write this.

If there is such a thing as a level playing field, it’s as close right now as it will ever be. Those who will be assessed against the new framework all have the same opportunity now whilst awaiting their exam results, to get to know the CVF and to raise their awareness and understanding of it.

Some may wonder why on earth would you start reading up on the new framework already, when you don’t know your exam result yet? Now there’s a question!

“While we are making up our minds as to when we shall begin, the opportunity is lost.” – Quintillion

A proportion of those awaiting results will procrastinate, unwittingly running the risk of being left behind by waiting for this announcement as their starting gun.

Others commit fully, decision made, knowing instinctively that the starting gun has already been fired. They make full use of time before exam results are known, to get ahead of the curve and to be in the best position possible when a promotion process opens. Those who do this also recognise their own responsibility to drive and maintain their CPD (notably the number 1 recommendation from the CoP Leadership Review!).

“Development is always self-development. Nothing could be more absurd than for the enterprise to assume responsibility for the development of a person. The responsibility rests with the individual, their abilities, their efforts.” Peter Drucker

Candidates who prepare ahead inevitably find that they are better able to ‘hit the ground running’ when a promotion process is announced. They realise the value of homework on the framework, often drafting values based evidence aligned to the competencies (aka ‘behaviours’). Others realise too late. It dawns upon them that the CVF takes time to digest, to absorb and to think through, let alone work through.

Battle of the Shires…

“Change. We don’t like it, but we can’t stop it from coming. We either adapt to change or we get left behind. It hurts to grow, anybody who tells you it doesn’t is lying, but here’s the truth sometimes the more things change the more they stay the same. Sometimes change is good.” – Meredith Grey

Some forces introduced the CVF before April. Having already supported officers at level 2 and 3 of the CVF in achieving promotion to Sergeant/Inspector, I’ve had some interesting anecdotal conversations along the way. Safe to say there are a wide range of strong views and opinions on the CVF!

There are clearly two distinct tribes of opinion, battling in the warzone of police promotion:

  1. First there are those who are clearly bitter, seeing themselves as a victim of unfair changes hampering their ability to get promoted. They will criticise and question how fit the new framework is for policing and may even put forward some convincing arguments.

  2. Then there are those with a growth mindset. Whether reluctantly or enthusiastically, they are navigating their way through the challenge, adapting the way they may have previously prepared. They get on with it, knowing there is no single best system for promotion selections!

The CVF is new for supervisors, HR departments and assessors. As with any change there will be issues as this new framework beds in with lots of learning and adjustments.

A Way Forward

“The process of going from confusion to understanding is a precious, even emotional, experience that can be the foundation of self-confidence” – Brian Greene

John Wooden said, “It’s what you learn after you know it all that counts”, and that’s a great starting point for everyone.

Reading through all available guidance is a helpful first step. Many candidates attempt a promotion process without even a rudimentary understanding of their promotion framework, often overlooking what is a precious source of information. If you aspire to promotion and want to be successful, the most valuable action you can take today is to familiarise yourself with the promotion framework your force uses.

The reason for this is simple: It’s jam packed full of golden nuggets of information to help raise your awareness. It describes what ‘good’ looks like and provides guidance to help align your evidence for promotion applications and interviews.

The framework is now in place. The CVF has been crowned King of UK police promotion frameworks… “Long live the CVF!” Your allegiance will grow stronger after some hard work to start making sense of it for yourself. Then you’ll be able to start aligning and drafting your evidence to the behaviours and shared values.

Unless of course you reside in the MET, which everyone knows is a separate Kingdom, far from the shires, where things are done a differently. Here, when it comes to promotion it is: “Long live the MLF!” In any case I always encourage my clients to look at both frameworks to gain a deeper understanding of the Sergeant’s role from two different perspectives.

I’ll leave the last word to someone who knew a thing or two about overcoming challenges…

“Some people dream of success. Others wake up and work hard at it.” – Winston Churchill

Wherever you are on your promotion journey, Rank Success can help you prepare effectively. Why not download a FREE guide & start today?

Let us know your views by tweeting @PoliceHour We'll feature the best tweets within the article.

Police Promotion what is the role of a Police Sergeant?

As promised in my last blog Police Promotion: The Knowns and Unknowns, this article and the one that follows, will focus on the Sergeant’s role.

First Things First

“The best way to predict your future is to create it” – Abraham Lincoln

First things first, a thought once crossed your mind. Something similar to: ‘I believe that I have the potential to lead others in a formal leadership position as Sergeant’. Anyone can think it. You took action. You studied for months to move a step closer, towards making the jump. Converting that initial belief into reality. You’ve passed the Sergeant’s promotion exam.

Momentum maintained you might already be through the application and/or additional assessment tests.

There’s just the interview to go. It’s time. You’ve just sat down. Introductions over. The Chair of the board speaks:

“How would you describe your understanding of the Sergeant’s role?”

If this initial question identifies a gap in your knowledge, that’s good news because you can get to work on filling it. You have a fantastic opportunity right now, today, to develop your own response.

I’ll sometimes ask this question in coaching to help ascertain where individuals are in terms of preparedness. In my experience of helping officers to achieve promotion, I find initial responses to this question fall into two approaches.

Quietness

“Silence is more eloquent than words.” Thomas Carlyle

Silence. Tumbleweed blows by. A church bell could chime in the distance. You get the picture. It feels a bit like being in a Spaghetti Western!

But there’s a lot of thinking going on when it’s quiet. Silence can be a good sign, certainly in coaching sessions.

Silence might precede a well-considered response or the realisation that though you might be performing the role in acting or temporary capacity, your confidence is low when talking about it. Of course, it may also mean that the right words are not there…yet!

It’s OK. After all, no one walks around in a state of readiness for a promotion board!

The Al Capone Response

“Deliver your words not by number but by weight” H.G. Bohn

The other response I see is a ‘verbal scattergun’ approach. This is where a candidate machine-guns words in the hope that they are saying the right things. It’s sometimes nerves or manifestations of one of the biggest fears people have about interviews: drying up or having nothing to say.

The good news is that a scattergun approach can be refined with practice, into a more considered response aligned to the role functions and responsibilities!

Role awareness

“Simples” – Alexander Meerkat

In footballing terms the question “Would you please describe your understanding of the Sergeant’s role?” is an open goal. They don’t come any easier.

It’s the kind of question that could be presented to you on a velvet cushion. With a pink bow, some sprinkles and a cherry on top. It’s a real gift! But there’s a caveat: It’s only an open goal or a gift for the well prepared.

You may be thinking: ‘Really? But that’s such a simple question!’

Most people will gladly have a go at answering this question. Outside the interview room it’s easy peasy. Or is it?

Try and find someone, anyone, who can answer this question well, off the top of his or her head. You’ll hear a wide variety of responses ranging from guesses, through to quite articulate waffle that might cause you to regret asking in the first place!

Knowing the role, spending time to develop your understanding around it means that even if you don’t get asked directly about it; you can be on the front foot and proactively communicating in interview what you do know about it.

Board members want candidates to do well, so it’s a pleasure when they get to hear professional responses from candidates who have clearly put some work in beforehand.

Take a few moments to think about and then describe what kind of behaviours and values a sergeant should be demonstrating. It’s a good place to start.

Role – ‘The behaviour pattern that an individual presents to others” TheFreeDictionary.com

The Role of Sergeant…

Being a Sergeant is less about working in the spotlight yourself and more about focusing it on your team. Being able to link the role to performance outcomes is crucial to preparing examples of competence you may have; especially to convincing a board that you will manage performance.

But where is the Sergeant’s role written down? Where do you start? You’d think that would be the easy part. In some ways it is. Every force has role profiles, job descriptions and responsibilities for supervisors. You may also be provided with packs as part of your force promotion selection process to get some ideas.

In a nutshell, I would say the role is to set, communicate and reinforce standards in the organisation.

You can also get an overview from your force promotion framework. However, there are various aspects to the Sergeants’ role. It’s why there are different frameworks. It’s also why I encourage my clients to look at other force frameworks to help develop a wider appreciation of the role.

All things considered there’s quite a bit of information to think about.

Here’s one example or overview of the role from the Policing Professional Framework (PPF). It describes ‘personal qualities’ under various headings of a competent supervisory manager. It states a Sergeant must be able to:

Conduct intelligence driven briefing, tasking and debriefing
Prepare for, monitor and maintain, law enforcement operations
Supervise the response to critical incidents
Supervise investigations and investigators
Manage your own resources
Provide leadership for your team

The College of Policing’s new Competency and Values Framework (CVF) also sets out behaviours and values of the Sergeant’s role:

The CVF has 6 competencies.
Each competency has 3 levels describing what behaviours look like in practice.

The competencies are underpinned by 4 values.Then there’s the Metropolitan Leadership Framework (MLF):

This describes 4 main behaviour groups
There are 11 sub competencies
Competencies are underpinned by 4 values

Can You Spot The Difference!

If you saw a Sergeant walking down the street would you be able to tell if it was a PPF, CVF or MLF Sergeant? Could you spot the difference? Of course not, but there are various different descriptions of the role.

You’ll see that there is no shortage of information out there. So when you are asked about the role there’s a wide range of potential responses to the question: “How would you describe your understanding of the Sergeant’s role?”

Here’s a sentence to get you started.

“As a leader, manager and supervisor, I understand the Sergeant’s role as being critical to setting, communicating and reinforcing standards in the organisation….”

(How would you develop this response? What will you include?)

Here are some more questions to trigger some thinking and get you started:

What are your own expectations of the role?
What do you believe the public expect and deserve from this role?
What does your force expect from Sergeants?

In part 2, I’ll focus in more detail on some of the wider functions and responsibilities of the Sergeants’ role. Until then, wherever you are on your promotion journey I hope I have provided you with some food for thought.

 

Let us know your views by tweeting @PoliceHour We'll feature the best tweets within the article.

Police Promotion the Knowns and Unknowns

Promotion to Sergeant and Inspector ranks are significant transitions in any policing career.

Becoming More Promotable

Following a kind invitation from Police Hour, I am delighted to have this opportunity to support UK police officers aspiring to police promotion and looking to make the jump to first and second line supervisor positions.

With that in mind, i aim over coming months to offer guidance to help navigate some of the real and perceived barriers associated with achieving promotions.

If you missed my initial blog you can find it here: The Greasy Pole 

I thought I would start this blog by looking at some things generally well known around promotion in the service, whilst also considering valuable aspects that often remain unknown.

Over the next couple of months, I’ll expand on some of these themes to ensure officers working to become ‘more promotable’ can benefit from FREE tips and insights to raise awareness and deliver their best performance when it matters.

You Don’t Know What You Don’t Know

Preparing ahead is a simple strategy for promotion success.

Adopting this approach will help confirm what you know, identify what you don’t and identify things you hadn’t even thought about knowing.

Imagine walking into your promotion board and every question the panel asks you is an unwelcome surprise.

You struggle to understand the relevance of the first question. You are uncomfortable. You find yourself struggling to string together a meaningful response. You wish the earth would open up and swallow you. It’s a big relief when it’s all over. You know afterwards in your heart that they didn’t see you at your best.

Does this happen? Yes. Is it entirely avoidable? Of course!

I was inspired to write this blog partly through speaking recently to a group of promotion candidates. Some honestly believed that being effective at their day job equated to being a good promotion candidate. Signposting them to certain information resources came as a significant revelation with one commenting:

You don’t know what you don’t know, how are you supposed to know this stuff?

This brought to mind the following quote by Donald Rumsfeld, former U.S. Secretary of Defence:

As we know, there are known knowns; these are things we know we know. We also know that there are known unknowns; that is to say, we know there are some things we do not know. But there are also unknown unknowns – the ones we don’t know we don’t know. – Donald Rumsfeld

People initially thought Rumsfeld’s speech was nonsense but I believe the statement makes good sense.

Scientific research often investigates known unknowns, so when it comes to awareness levels and knowledge in the context of preparing for police promotion opportunities, I thought it might be helpful to reflect upon Rumsfeld’s statement and some of its points.

Known Knowns

Things we know we know about promotion selection processes include some of the steps involved:

  • Written applications
  • Psychometric tests
  • Interview/board

Written applications

The initial application could be a full competency-based format or a simple registration form. If the former, there’ll be a requirement to align your evidence or examples to your own force promotion framework (CVF/MLF/PPF).

Word limits apply too, ranging between 250 words to a couple of thousand.

We know some forces don’t require applications, instead, they require first-line supervisors to ‘write up’ individuals to be considered for promotion.

Psychometric tests

Additional gateway stages involving psychometric tests are now a common feature of promotion selection processes.

These include Inductive Reasoning Tests (IRT) or ‘diagrammatic style’ tests, designed to measure abilities important in solving problems.

Another variant is the Situational Judgment Test (SJT), which assesses the ability to choose the most appropriate action in workplace situations. It’s considered to be a particularly effective measure of managerial and leadership capabilities. There are others.

Interview 

This is perhaps the best of the known knowns.

An interview is a consistent theme and perhaps the most recognised component of a selection process AKA a promotion board.

Although it’s well known, individuals still turn up and knock on this particular door of opportunity significantly unprepared for it. That’s despite weeks and sometimes months of advance notice.

The timescales for a promotion selection process are a known, along with the fact that line supervisors are likely to recommend you for promotion and hopefully offer assistance.

We also know there is always more to learn and support is appreciated and valued.

Last but no means least, we know there will be more candidates than posts – ergo competition.

Known Unknowns

Things we do not know. 

In my experience, it is not unusual for aspiring officers to not know the role they are applying for. Being able to speak about it for five minutes is beyond them initially.

It’s easily admitted by most and quickly remedied but it’s a significant knowledge gap for anyone hoping to impress a promotion panel. Having a good understanding of the role also facilitates confidence in being proactive in written applications and verbally in an interview.

Another known unknown is lack of understanding around the type of interview or kind of questions candidates will face. Again, this gap is easily filled and awareness improved, so that reasonable anticipation of questions and potential responses can be considered and factored into effective preparation.

Wider challenges facing policing, a candidate’s force or what they will do as a newly promoted Sergeant or Inspector to contribute to successful policing are frequently recognised as known unknowns. A few choice questions can quickly identify these gaps and get to work on filling them so that a candidate is not only aware but has an in-depth insight and focus on what they have to offer the force in tackling these issues as a newly promoted leader, manager and supervisor.

A simple thing that can bypass candidates is the value of guidance and instructions issued by their force for the forthcoming promotion process. This often includes specific detail about what is important for the organisation at the time, qualities the force is looking for, guidance around the process and important rules to follow (e.g. Word limits)

Lots of candidates know they don’t know these things, but they attempt the process anyway. Nothing wrong with that in itself, but preparing ahead to get it right first time is about working smart as well as hard.

Especially when support is often hidden in plain sight.

Unknown Unknowns

These are things we don’t know we don’t know. For example, did you know that different forces have different promotion processes in place at different times for different ranks?

Not a lot of people know that  – Michael Caine

Most unknown unknowns can be thought of as ‘impossible to imagine in advance’. In other words, unidentified risks.

Preparing you to be an all round better candidate, confident and aware with a rounded perspective on leadership and your own development needs, can take time. The benefit is that it stands you in good stead for any process.

Discovering your unknown unknowns is about converting them to known unknowns so that they become manageable. You can focus and fill your gaps from there.

Why Are the Goal Posts Changing? 

Unknown unknowns become apparent or may ‘surface’ in coaching conversations. Alternatively, the ‘penny drops’ in a promotion Masterclass, where an unknown issue is highlighted and can then be expanded upon as required.

What occurs out there in the wider world and how it links to changing requirements in the context of promotion processes is one example. Common questions officers ask include:

  • Why are the goalposts changing?
  • Why are all these tests being introduced?
  • What have they got to do with policing?

These unknown unknowns remain unanswered for many.

It comes as surprise news that the World Economic Forum (WEF) has identified specific skills needed – up to 2020 and beyond – by leaders and line managers across various industries. It detailed them in a report the ‘Future of Jobs’ as follows:

  • Complex Problem Solving
  • Critical Thinking
  • Emotional Intelligence
  • People Management
  • Co-ordinating with others
  • Judgement and Decision Making
  • Cognitive Flexibility.

Now overlay them across assessment tests in current police promotion selection processes and you can quickly recognise links, understand the context and get to work on practising assessment tests in advance to close your gaps. These skills are assessed against competencies described in your force promotion framework (e.g. decision making)

Indicators of Leadership High Potential

A common unknown is that the College of Policing (COP) has produced a document, which details indicators of leadership high potential. You’ll find it as an appendix to fast-track promotion guidance.

It describes expectations and is helpful for aspiring promotion candidates to align against. You can recognise skills identified in the WEF ‘Future of Jobs’ report including Emotional intelligence, Critical thinking and Decision-making.

Image Reproduced with permission of the College of Policing.

7 Things Promotion Boards Also Look For

Finally, if you are preparing ahead and would like something to trigger and support your thinking, you might discover some known knowns, known unknowns or even unknown unknowns in my FREE 50 page downloadable guide: ‘7 Things Promotion Boards Also Look For’.

In my next two blogs, I’ll focus on the roles of Sergeant and Inspector.Until then, wherever you are on your promotion journey I hope I have provided you with some food for thought.

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The Greasy Pole Police Promotion by Steve Cooper

The aim of a promotion selection process is to fill positions in the police service and to promote the best available people. These are usually individuals whose depth and breadth of preparation underpins hard-won success.

The Free Dictionary describes the ‘greasy pole’ as being used to talk about someone’s attempts to reach a more successful position in their career. You don’t hear the term so much today but economic and political drivers acting on the police service are constantly changing the landscape, not least in the field of promotions.

A mix and match approach with selection processes across various forces currently includes supervisor recommendations, applications, psychometric tests, presentations and interviews.

Whichever system is in place some people will always be dissatisfied. There is no one best system, but achieving a promotion is a significant challenge. It should be. It’s a competition, with many more qualified individuals than vacancies.

Preparing for nine months leading up to a competitive Sergeants selection process (involving an application stage, a situational judgment test and an interview) was the approach taken by one of my successful clients.

“It’s a very hard process, but so worth it if you are willing and able to put the time and work in”.

Entering a promotion selection process can be like purchasing a ticket for a roller coaster ride, with highs of elation and lows of dejection. The experience of many who embark on this aspect of career progression is that there are no guarantees. Not everyone succeeds. Resilience and perseverance are called for. Some individuals repeat the same things whilst expecting a different outcome. The right support at the right time can make a significant difference to how you approach a promotion as this client discovered.

“I’ve tried for 9 years and sat 7 boards. This year I fully embraced your masterclass and passed”

Different routes exist and promotion is not referred to as the greasy pole for nothing. Some people believe the promotion is owed to them, a reward for past performance. This is a mistake. Promotion is awarded to those offering the best future for the organisation and you may need an overwhelming appetite to advance in what is a highly competitive environment.

Despite all this, promotions still tick over as does policing. With some hard smart work, you too can achieve promotion success. A continuous professional development plan, taking responsibility for your learning and a positive attitude are vital considerations if you want to be ‘match fit’ for opportunities that may arise. A clear focus on working towards your goal is required and solid preparation is the key to success.

If you choose promotion as your future it’s wise to be prepared today.

To download a free guide for Promotion Frameworks and 7 Things Promotion Interview Boards also look for click here now or to download Steve Coopers Sergeant Promotion Toolkit please click here!.

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Leadership Grounded in Service Delivery by Steve Cooper

We have teamed up with Steve Cooper Police Promotion coach to bring you free tools and resources to help with your Police Promotion prep, Steve Cooper is one of the leading police promotion coaches in the United Kingdom.

Thanks to Steve and his company Rank Success is able to offer Police Hour readers free promotion tools that other coaches would charge you for, thanks to our great relation with Steve we are able to offer you this advice, information and valuable police promotion information and advice absolutely free of charge for the Police Hour readers looking for Police Promotion.

The focus of this exclusive editorial feature written by Steve Cooper is the ‘7 Things interview boards also look for in promotion candidates’ is knowledge of the policing environment you aspire to lead in.  Here are the 7 key traits which police promotion boards inherently value:

  1. Good awareness and understanding of vision or mission
  2. Self-aware, understanding personal values and development areas
  3. Demonstrates awareness of the current policing context
  4. A response that goes beyond the theoretical
  5. Able to evidence leadership impact in & beyond your team
  6. Well-structured and considered responses
  7. Demonstrate strong leadership skills grounded in service delivery

Thing 7: Demonstrating Strong Leadership Skills, Grounded in Service Delivery

“Know what it is you are trying to accomplish and ensure others involved know the same.” – Patrick D. McGowan

All Bound for Mu Mu Land…

Leadership and Service Delivery are concepts featuring in all UK police promotion frameworks; the Competency and Values Framework (CVF), Police Promotion Framework (PPF) and the Metropolitan Leadership Framework (MLF). You can read a summary of CVF/PPF/MLF here, where you will learn they are not to be confused with the ‘Justified Ancients of Mu Mu Framework’ (KLF). I digress… These frameworks are key expectations of both Sergeant and Inspector roles.

The promotion board will of course have a marking guide and six or so questions for you, based on the rank competencies.  Adhering to the relevant competencies of the rank you aspire to in your verbal responses is a good strategy. This is almost always based on a sound understanding of your force promotion framework and aligning your own evidence to it.

So when it comes to service delivery, what indicators could a promotion panel consider when deciding whether to promote YOU instead of ‘A. N. Other’ candidate they may interview? This blog will take you through some of the human considerations of these supposedly ‘objective’ competencies.

Focus on Delivery

“Act as if what you do makes a difference. It does.” – William James

Who why what

A ‘focus on delivery’ (internally and externally) is one indicator of potential. In raising your awareness around this, it may be helpful as part of your wider preparation to think through and ask yourself the following questions:

  • Are you someone who consistently sees things through to completion, delivering against challenging deadlines? 
  • Do you go above and beyond what is expected to get the job done? 
  • Do you take opportunities? 
  • Do you step out of your comfort zone to try new ways of doing things? 

I suspect the answer to all of these is a resounding yes. In the interests of preparing yourself ahead of a promotion opportunity however, you might want to delve a little deeper by asking yourself these further structured questions against the ones outlined above:

  • When did I do this? (CONTEXT)
  • What did I do? (SPECIFICS)
  • How did I do it? (ALIGNED TO COMPETENCIES)
  • Say to yourself “So what?” (RESULT / OUTCOME)

Spending some time reflecting like this can help you think through and develop some considered responses. You will be delivering these responses, to help the board see and hear that you are a candidate who considers and understands wider aspects. Someone who understands the role.

The Role

“When we all play our part the world will run as designed. Do your part, do it now!” – Temitope Ibrahim

What do you know about the role of Sergeant/Inspector? Everything or nothing? In truth it’s likely to be somewhere in between. Clearly, the more you know and understand about it the better. But both the Sergeant and Inspector role have expectations and responsibilities around managing resources, e.g. time, money, people and equipment linked to how service is delivered or provided.

Ask yourself – When have I managed resources to deliver, improve or recover service? 

What did you do? How did you do it? Then say to yourself “So what?” 

That might sound a little blunt, but it’s a good way of holding yourself accountable in formulating your evidence; it’s of limited use offering examples without a result or outcome. By limited use of course, I mean scoring 2 or 3 rather than 4 or 5 (out of 5). Remember that ‘good, better, BEST‘ mantra??

Promotion to Inspector

Service Delivery – Internal

“Within the context of reducing budgets and changing demand, the police service can continue to provide service but it will have to be delivered in different ways. We are determined to be as innovative as possible in meeting these challenges.” – From Reshaping Policing for the Public.

It is the Sergeant who, based on job knowledge and experience, directs the daily work of their team. With this in mind, what is your responsibility to deliver service internally? You’ll be expected to impart shared values, standards and culture to those under your supervision and as an aspiring promotion candidate, you’ll have a good idea of the kind of working environment you want to foster for your team. One in which people feel supported and where they are free to innovate, thrive and excel. Why is this important?

To ascertain your focus around this, the board might want to hear about your leadership and how you will set, communicate and reinforce standards to ensure service delivery and promote ethical behaviour.

Service Delivery – External

“The police service is under unprecedented pressure, having to deal simultaneously with financial austerity and changing patterns of crime. The police need to better understand the changing nature of demand on their services.” – Rick Muir

The effective investigation of crime, alleviating anti-social behaviour in communities and keeping the public informed all drive and maintain public confidence.

As an Inspector your role will include delivering and implementing plans in addition to allocating and monitoring the quality and progress of work relating to these and other aspects of service delivery.

  • So what do you know about wider challenges the service faces, particularly relating to understanding and/or managing demand?
  • What is your force doing well at the moment?
  • What is not being done so well? Why?
  • How can things be done more effectively and/or efficiently?
  • What will you do as a new Inspector to help the organisation move forward?

Addressing some or all of the above points and questions will help to elevate your awareness and increase your focus around service delivery. The name of the game.

Let us know your views by tweeting @PoliceHour We'll feature the best tweets within the article.

Promotion Interview Ahead? Don’t Let Al Capone Get You by Steve Cooper

We have teamed up with Steve Cooper Police Promotion coach to bring you free tools and resources to help with your Police Promotion prep, Steve Cooper is one of the leading police promotion coaches in the United Kingdom.

Thanks to Steve and his company Rank Success is able to offer Police Hour readers free promotion tools that other coaches would charge you for, thanks to our great relation with Steve we are able to offer you this advice, information and valuable police promotion information and advice absolutely free of charge for the Police Hour readers looking for Police Promotion.

The focus of this exclusive editorial feature written by Steve Cooper is the ‘7 Things interview boards also look for in promotion candidates’ is knowledge of the policing environment you aspire to lead in. As a reminder, here are the 7 key traits which police promotion boards inherently value:

  1. Good awareness and understanding of vision or mission
  2. Self-aware, understanding personal values and development areas
  3. Demonstrates awareness of the current policing context
  4. A response that goes beyond the theoretical
  5. Able to evidence leadership impact in & beyond your team
  6. Well-structured and considered responses
  7. Demonstrate strong leadership skills grounded in service delivery

Thing 6: Promotion Interview Ahead? Don’t Let Al Capone Get You

“Be precise. A lack of precision is dangerous when the margin for error is small.” – Donald Rumsfeld

A police promotion interview is arguably the most important element of a promotion selection process. This post is about getting the structure right. Good structure allows the panel to witness your communication skills and abilities first hand.

The focus of this 6th blog in this series of ‘7 Things Interview Boards Also Look for in Promotion Candidates’ is well-structured and considered interview responses.

The good news is that the necessary skills and abilities can be learned and developed. Unsurprisingly, those who pay attention to this are candidates who tend to stand out. Indirectly, the board members are also likely get an appreciation and impression of your attitude and prior commitment to preparation. They may even ask, “What have you done to prepare?”

The board want to know:

  • Are you a good risk?
  • Do you have the right skills to take the substantive position?
  • Can you do the job?
  • Will you do the job?
  • Do you act and speak as a leader, supervisor and manager?

‘Well structured and considered’ hints at a level of preparation that goes beyond simply turning up on the day, hoping all goes well and ‘winging it’.

Avoid Al Capone

Typically you will be asked around half a dozen questions in a promotion interview.

Police promotion scattergun approach

If you prepare sufficiently, you’ll be better equipped to respond effectively. If you don’t prepare, you run the risk of defaulting to the ‘Al Capone’ approach.

This is where you find yourself ‘machine gunning’ your words in a scattergun, indiscriminate or haphazard way, hoping you are saying the right things. But inside you may secretly be wishing you had made more of an effort to prepare yourself.

The opposite approach is silence. Having lots to say, but nothing will come out because you are stuck: ‘Speaker’s block’ if you like. Nerves get in the way and the words just don’t seem to flow. Incidentally, this is one of the biggest fears expressed when it comes to interviews. A commitment to some smart preparation can avoid these shortcomings and support you in developing a more confident approach.

The board members will be writing down a summary of what you say. Time spent considering how you might respond is often the difference between success and failure. It also boosts your confidence, because you become more familiar with what is expected.

Sshhhh: Take a moment…

“Speak in haste, repent at leisure”

Listen to the interview question

Just because you have been asked a question by the board, that doesn’t mean you have to respond in a nanosecond. It’s important to listen first.Take a moment to register the question. Listening is a leadership and communication skill and it’s something that can be developed as part of your preparation. Good candidates are tuned into that.

Once you are clear about what it is that you have been asked, you may want to consider a short ‘opening statement’. This is a precursor to your main answer. It’s one way to buy yourself a little bit of extra thinking time, whilst still considering your main response. An opening statement is something I encourage all candidates to consider and it’s an approach that seems to work quite well.

You can see how an opening statement might be used in the example response featured below.

Structure, Structure, STRUCTURE!

“I thrive in structure. I drown in chaos.” Anna Kendrick

Structuring your response supports a professional delivery by keeping you focused on what you are saying and the order to how you are saying it. There are various structures you can choose so the important thing is to find one that works for you. Using structure supports your confidence, which in turn helps you relax and more easily convey your appealing credentials.

Structured interview responses

The following feedback from one of my clients, David, helps demonstrate the value of using structure…

“In my board I used STRUCTURE STRUCTURE STRUCTURE. The biggest boost I felt as I walked through the door was confidence in my preparation. This allowed me to relax relatively given the situation. As I relaxed, I felt my answers flowed and I was able to display passion and commitment. I am overjoyed at having attained the rank of Inspector”

One structure you might use is ‘STAR’. It is well known and used widely. It stands for Situation, Task, Action and Result. It’s a commonly used aid to help ensure that your verbal responses include the necessary information the board need for scoring. STAR can be adapted, but note it doesn’t ‘fit’ all questions or scenarios, such as those which do not require an example.

Content

“By stretching yourself beyond your perceived level of confidence you accelerate your development of competence” – Michael Gelb

What you say is important. The dictionary tells us that ‘competence’ means the ability to do something successfully or efficiently. That’s what the board are looking to find out about you. Competencies communicate HOW the organisation wants people to behave in certain roles. Therefore the main ‘content’ of your responses will need to reflect the relevant competency or personal quality that each question alludes to.

This is where it pays dividends to do some homework on the frameworkyour force uses for promotion, e.g. the Policing Professional Framework (PPF), Metropolitan Leadership Framework (MLF) or the Competency and Values Framework (CVF).

I encourage my clients to not just know the framework, but also to understand it. A cursory read through is not enough. Becoming familiar with the competencies being assessed and being able to explain them, at least in summary, is a professional approach. Better performing candidates make that commitment to themselves. Once you have an understanding of the competencies, you’ll be able to verbalise and ‘make links’ to important issues including the role, mission, vision, values, adding value to your response.

Note: Some forces may provide the candidate with a hard copy of the questions at the start of the interview. Whilst that may make things easier in some respects, only well prepared candidates are likely to be able to exploit any potential this may offer.

Delivery – So what DOES an effective response look like?

“The single biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place” – George Bernard Shaw

Using STAR as the structure, you can see what an effective response might look like in the following example. This example was used successfully as part of achieving promotion to Sergeant. It’s a Constable to Sergeant level question, where the competency being assessed is Public Service from the Policing Professional Framework (PPF).

Here’s the PPF guidance:

[Demonstrates a real belief in public service, focusing on what matters to the public and will best serve their interests. Understands the expectations, changing needs and concerns of different communities, and strives to address them. Builds public confidence by talking with people in local communities to explore their viewpoints and break down barriers between them and the police. Understands the impact and benefits of policing for different communities, and identifies the best way to deliver services to them. Develops partnerships with other agencies to deliver the best possible overall service to the public].

Here’s the question:

“Please give an example of how you have built public confidence within the communities you serve”.

Pause: Let the panel members see you are thinking about & considering the question! And deliver…

Promotion interview delivery

Opening statement: “As Temporary Sergeant I am currently responsible for chairing meetings with partners, including council officials, housing providers and youth services. I know that alleviating antisocial behaviour in communities is a key driver of public confidence”.

Situation: “An increase in complaints arose recently because youths were engaging in ASB near homes occupied by vulnerable residents requiring repeated calls for service”.

Task: “My aims were to reduce demand and restore resident’s confidence”.

Actions: “Taking into consideration available resources, I implemented a proactive operation to tackle the problem. I utilised Police Community Support Officers supported by Special Constables. I considered a local dispersal order obtained via my Inspector, allowing officers to legally remove youths from areas. I personally briefed officers, focusing upon key offenders. I instructed that reports concerning enforcement action were to be submitted so I could follow up appropriate referrals. I spoke with partners arranging for warning letters to be issued. Throughout the operation I considered victims, partners and local residents by updating them to build trust/confidence in my commitment to resolve long term problems”.

Result: “Analysis of this operation over a two month period showed a 50% reduction in calls for service. Residents acknowledged improvements individually and collectively at community meetings and further updates were published using social media for wider community impact. Utilising Special Constables for proactive policing in this way contributed to their collective duty hours being the highest across the area. My debriefing identified learning around future working practices for sharing joint agency resources more effectively, which I am currently developing”.

Insights:

  • The board may ask ‘supplementary questions’ to any main question. This is a means to ‘probe’ and get all the information required for scoring e.g. they may ask additionally, “What did you consider?” “What was the outcome?”. This can also be a way to encourage or support a nervous candidate who may have missed out some detail and who just needs a ‘nudge’ to connect with the rest of the information. The board want you to do well and this is a legitimate way help you get into your ‘flow.
  • The above is one example of what a well structured and considered response looks like. If you want to know what one sounds like and feels like, you’ll need to work through your own evidence and examples. Try it! If you don’t have any examples of your own to hand read this one out loud. Hear how you sound. Speaking normally it takes about two minutes. That’s a great start, but practising will fine tune your confidence and delivery. So don’t let Al Capone get you!

Taking Action…

All successful candidates have one thing in common: They took action.

If you are serious about preparing, why not download your very own digital guide NOW with 25+ structured examples of what works.

 

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