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Lush ‘intimidated by ex-police officers’ over controversial campaign

Lush has been forced to take down it’s controversial campaign from some shops.

They say they have received intimidation from ex-police officers.

The Police Federation had branded the campaign damaging and distasteful.

While members of the public left over 31K 1 star reviews on the companies Facebook page.

Lush released a statement today saying they will continue the SpyCops campaign despite not feeling able to have it within the windows of some shops.

“Whilst intimidation of our shop staff from ex-police officers and unhelpful tweets from those in high office are ongoing, not all of our shops feel able today to have the campaign window in their shops,” it said in a statement on Saturday.

“However the campaign is still running for three weeks and we will be constantly weighing up what to do about the situation.”

The campaign itself was a protest of undercover policing tactics used in the 80s and 90s, but not knowing the background to this story is damaging to everyday policing and the officers who work hard to keep us safe.

The company based in Poole launched the campaign on Friday which hopes to highlight the current lack of progress into the undercover policing inquiry and the granting of anonymity to key police witnesses.

They are known for selling bath and soap products but now they’ve cut off an entire emergency services and emergency services supporters market.

They will lose entire police family’s Sons, Daughters, Husbands, Wives, Grandads & Nana’s after they have aimed a blow at British policing.

The Thin Blue Line and extended emergency services family are urged to talk with their feet by not shopping or supporting Lush.

After there new campaign focuses on corruption leaving us wondering who they’ll call when they have a shoplifter?

We’d fully expect a 100% reduction in phone calls from Lush when they have a shoplifter in store.

What is Paid to Lie?

Lush who are well known for their political activism has now launched a 2-week window campaign within all their stores.

They’re campaigning for a government enquiry into a handful of corrupt undercover police officers in the Met who were investigating animal rights extremists during the 80’s and 90’s.

You can be sure that the vast majority of the public will only see the large poster with the picture of a police officer and the message PAID TO LIE and not have the time or interest to research further. In this age of quick and lazy soundbites, this is a damaging and toxic generalisation about police officers.

Almost all police officers are actually honest and decent individuals doing a difficult and often unrewarding job to keep us safe.

We’d rightly be appalled if they had a poster of a teacher with the message of “PAID TO ABUSE CHILDREN” (based on the few instances of teachers convicted of such offences) or an NHS nurse or care home worker with a tagline “PAID TO BEAT UP OLD PEOPLE” (based on recent investigations exposing care home abuse).

In a statement Calum Macleod Chair of the Police Federation of England and Wales, said: “The Lush advertising campaign is offensive, disgusting and an insult to the hard work, professionalism and dedication of police officers throughout the UK.

“I cannot believe that someone, somewhere, actually thought this campaign was a good idea. All it serves to do is to criticise police officers and encourage an anti-police sentiment. Police officers already face enough abuse from those who break the law and are a menace to society, without the need for a cosmetic company to start putting the boot in too.

“I understand that there have been complaints to the Advertising Standards Authority, who will look in to the matter. However, I hope that Lush will have the good sense to realise they made a mistake; that they stop trying to defend an indefensible campaign, and they apologise to police officers and their families for the offence this poorly judged PR campaign has caused.

“I urge the management at Lush to come to their senses and retract this campaign and the offensive materials plastered in the windows of their stores – no doubt the company will have many employees who have friends and family in the service and I urge them also to act now and hold their bosses and the company to account.

“I also encourage them and the public to show their support by backing our ‘Believe in Blue’ campaign which celebrates British policing and the true value police officers bring to society.”

Reaction on Twitter

Peter Kirkham said: “Your anti police advertising campaign is an utter disgrace.

“It stereotypes ALL police officers as corrupt & includes some fundamental misrepresentations of the facts.

“I trust that you will never again seek police assistance if you are the victims of crime.”

Protect our police tweeted that this is ‘hugely damaging political campaign against policing

‘Vast majority of police officers are professional hard working members of the public’

Sergeant Mike Duzinkewycz tweeted ‘i worked for lush for many years before i joined the police and i’m heartbroken by this’

George Bellamy tweeted ‘misleading, inappropriate and extremely disappointing’

Rav Wilding tweeted ‘your page claims you “make mums proud” yet you have current campaign like this? That simply means i won’t step foot in your shops in future

‘Police work their backsides off for us all. I know that and thank them all’.

Lush have openly admitted they are on their Soap Box with Lush UK have said “being spied upon by the Special Demonstration Squad (SDS) – a unit within the Metropolitan Police’s Special Branch. In particular, about the intimate, five-year relationship I had with the man I knew as Mark Cassidy, who I later learned was undercover police officer Mark Jenner.

“The experience brings together the personal and political in a particularly unusual and powerful way. With other women who suffered similar experiences, we brought a legal case against the Metropolitan police for deploying these officers into our most private lives.”

To read the Full Lush article please see here

Let us know your views by tweeting @PoliceHour We'll feature the best tweets within the article.

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