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Corrie McKeague statement, evidence & questions #FindCorrie

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Corrie Mckeague has been missing since September

Detectives investigating the disappearance of Corrie McKeague have reached the point where there are no realistic lines of enquiry left to pursue.

As the missing airman has not been found the case will remain open and move to the Major investigation cold case team.

Any credible new information will continue to be followed up by officers.

Having been through all realistic possibilities in detail over the past 18 months since Corrie went missing in Bury St Edmunds on September 24, 2016, there is nothing to suggest any foul play or third party involvement.

Since November last year police have been re-examining the evidence relating to all realistic theories to identify whether there is anything else that could be done to establish what could have happened to Corrie.

However, this ‘mature assessment’ of all the evidence still points to Corrie being transported from the ‘horseshoe’ area in a bin lorry and ultimately taken to the Milton landfill site.

Detective Superintendent Katie Elliott said: “It is extremely disappointing that we have not been able to find Corrie. I can only imagine the strain Corrie’s family have been under over the past 18 months and I thank them for their patience and understanding.

“Whilst the investigation has drawn to a natural conclusion we will continue to work with the family to provide answers to their questions and help them understand what may have happened.

“Since Corrie disappeared, police have been exploring all proportionate and relevant lines of enquiry.

“We have now reached a point where we are unable to make any further progress, and have gone as far as we realistically can with the information we have. If any new, credible and proportionate enquiries relating to Corrie’s disappearance emerge we will pursue them.”

Corrie’s family have been informed of this development.

Assistant Chief Constable Simon Megicks from Suffolk Constabulary said: “Saddened as I am that we have not found Corrie, I have absolute confidence in the way the investigation was conducted.

“The major investigation team inquiry has been reviewed at various points by senior officers within the constabulary and external experts, including the East Midlands Special Operations Unit.

“The unit’s report concludes police have conducted a thorough and detailed investigation, and explored all reasonable lines of enquiry. It also endorses the primary hypothesis that Corrie ended up in the waste disposal process.”

Fact File:

1 More than 1,500 people have been spoken to during inquiry.

2 More than 2,000 hours of CCTV have been looked at.

3 A total of 529 statements have been taken.

4 The estimated size of the area searched outside of Milton landfill (i.e. open land searched etc.) Total square miles searched 20.4 miles  + road 6.5 miles

5 Size of Milton landfill site: The entire landfill site is set in 71.2 hectares. The area that was being used to take waste during September 2016 was an area known as Cell 22. Cell 22 is approximately 14 hectares in size.

6 Size of first area searched in Cell 22: Phase 1 06/03/17 – 21/07/17  20 weeks total 6,604 tonnes

7 Size of second area searched in Cell 22: Phase 2 23/10/17 – 11/12/17   7 weeks 1 day 2,867.5 tonnes

8 The search team on the landfill site consisted of a Police Search Adviser lead, Police Search Adviser team leader and eight Licensed Search Officers at any time per week.

Frequently Asked Questions

Why didn’t you find any sign of Corrie if the two areas searched on the landfill site were the likeliest areas where he could have been?

The records relied upon are not comprehensive and lack the detail required to identify precise search areas. Investigative enquiries identified the landfill site areas where Corrie was most likely to be. This does not rule out the possibility of him being elsewhere within that site or indeed at another landfill site.

Why didn’t police enlist the help of specialist search teams from the army to help search the Milton Landfill site?

All landfill searches undertaken by specially trained search officers. Using the RAF was considered, however they were unable to offer any specialist capability beyond our own resourcing.

Why can’t police continue to search other areas of the landfill site if it is believed to be the likeliest place for Corrie McKeague to be?

The areas where Corrie could be now, are vast; many times bigger than the area of landfill already searched. It would take years to complete. The environmental and legal impact of digging up such deep and wide areas of landfill is significant and prohibitive.

 Why, when Corrie’s last mobile signal was tracked on the same route as the bin lorry in the early stages of the inquiry, did police continue their searches in the direction of Honington instead of searching the recycling centre at Red Lodge or the Milton landfill site?

The investigation continued to remain open-minded. The weight of the bin collected that night and initially given to the police did not support the theory that Corrie was in the bin lorry. This has however since been corrected, and identified the bin was much heavier than normal.

Police did still explore the feasibility of searching the landfill and a preservation of the landfill was agreed early on with no further waste being added.

Was the decision to search the Milton landfill site solely based on the discovery of the original registered weight of the bin lorry being incorrect?

This decision was based upon reviewing all the evidence held within the inquiry, which included the absence of evidence supporting other theories. The weight of the bin was a considerable factor taken into consideration.

Are you sure police searched the correct bin lorry?

The correct bin lorry was seized and searched. No other bin lorry was seized.

Was there ever a time when there was a lack of staff to adequately resource the police incident room’s telephone lines or the investigation?

No

Have all the buildings in the Horseshoe and the other loading bay area been searched?

Yes – a number of searches have taken place both in the ‘horseshoe’ and the immediate surrounding area with experts including Crime Scene Examiners, trained searchers, recovery dogs and air support unit. This included both public / open areas and private premises and land.

What has been done about the reported sightings of Corrie around the Barton Mills and Mildenhall areas?

These have all been subject to review based upon all the evidence held within this inquiry. Each one has been individually followed up.  Additional searches have also been carried out where additional evidence has been received and supports such searching.

Is there any evidence of Corrie being alive?

There has been no corroborated sighting of Corrie and there has been no use of his bank card or passport since his disappearance.

Is it possible for Corrie to have left the Horseshoe without being seen on CCTV?

Despite over 2000 hours of CCTV footage viewed Corrie is not seen on any of it. It is deemed almost impossible for Corrie to have left the horseshoe on foot without being seen.

Have you identified and spoken to all the people who were on the CCTV images issued as part of the inquiry?

One person has yet to be identified. However, CCTV has been used to track the movements of that person and they have been ruled out as not being involved in the disappearance of Corrie. All other persons have been identified, spoken to and again ruled out from the inquiry.

Why, if there are further possible theories about what could have happened to Corrie, are they not being investigated?

Police have always remained open-minded and have continued to investigate and review all these theories. There is no evidence of any criminal activity or third party involvement. It has always been a missing person investigation.

What happened to the information MIS (McKenzie Intelligence Systems) – the company brought in by Nicola Urquhart – passed on the police?

MIS provided Suffolk Constabulary with a disk containing information from the Find Corrie Facebook page. This information was reviewed and did not create any new lines of inquiry.

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Fancy being locked in a haunted police cell?

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Forget Halloween Fancy a spooky night of fun, locked in a haunted cell for 24 hours to raise money for charity. Then we have an event that is right up your street.

Following on from the success of the PC Edward Walker Tour, Jules Berry a DDO with the Met Police is back with her spooky haunted cell idea to raise money for COPS UK and WMP History Museum, That is exactly what you can do this Feb.

Met Police Detention Officer Jules Berry is arranging the whole event in partnership with the WMP History Museum and is hoping to raise thousands of pounds for charity.

The event will take place on the 8th and 9th of February 2019, but be quick as places are limited.

Unfortunately, Police Hour will no longer be live streaming this event to our 2.5 Million Followers, But we hope our readers can still attend and support this event.

Need we say any more, Simply watch this video then sign up

Hats off to Kerry Blakeman for his fantastic advertorial.

The event is being held to support the restoration of the West Midlands Police Museum and COPS UK.

About COPS

COPS is the UK charity dedicated to helping the families of police officers who have lost their lives in relation to their duty, to rebuild their lives.

Since being founded in 2003, they have helped hundreds of families shattered by the loss of their police officer.

They aim to ensure that surviving family members have all the help they need

to cope with such a tragedy and they remain part of the police family.

What COPS do?

COPS is a peer support charity, enabling Survivors from around the UK to support other Survivors in practical ways. They arrange local and national events that enable Survivors to build friendships and bonds that support them through the good times and bad.

Families are rightly proud of their officer and COPS to help ensure that they remain part of the police family.

What about the WMP History?

The West Midlands Police Museum at Coventry was opened in 1959 and celebrates the history of Coventry City Police which existed between 1839 & 1969, before becoming part of Warwickshire and Coventry Constabulary and in 1974, West Midlands Police.

The site at Sparkhill has been operating since 1995 when it moved there from the force’s training facility at Tally Ho! where it been operating as a CID training facility since the mid 1970s. Several of the exhibits had originated from the old Forensic Science Service laboratory when it moved from Newton Street to Gooch Street.

The Sparkhill museum contains items of policing memorabilia and old records from the West Midlands Police predecessor forces of Birmingham City Police, Walsall Borough Police, Dudley Borough Police, Wolverhampton Borough Police and West Midlands Constabulary. Some records are also held of Staffordshire County Police and Worcestershire officers as parts of those forces now fall within the West Midlands Police area.

You can also drop an email [email protected] to sign up, you must raise a minimum of £250 sponsorship.

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What on earth is happening in Salisbury? Two people fall seriously ill

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Emergency Services have launched a major incident after two people have fallen ill in Salisbury.

Officers have placed a cordon around Prezzo Restaurant after a man and woman were taken ill.

Police have declared a major incident. Police do not believe this is linked to Novichok.

Police received a call from the ambulance service to Prezzo restaurant, in High Street, at approximately 6.45pm. Two people, a man aged in his 40s and a woman aged in her 30s, had become unwell.

Due to recent events in the city and concerns that the pair had been exposed to an unknown substance, a highly precautionary approach was taken by all emergency services.

Both were taken to Salisbury District Hospital and were clinically assessed. We can now confirm that there is nothing to suggest that Novichok is the substance. Both people remain in hospital under observation.

The major incident status has now been stood down.

At this stage it is not yet clear if a crime has been committed and enquiries remain ongoing.

Salisbury District Hospital remains open as usual.

A cordon will remain in place around Prezzo at this time as part of ongoing routine enquiries. All other areas that were cordoned off will now be reopened.

We’d like to thank the public for their patience as a result of the impact of this incident.

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Homeless man covered in red spray paint found dead in cemetery days later

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Police say they are not linking the incidents together despite a vile video being uploaded to Facebook just days before.

Sick thugs covered the homeless man in red paint as he sat outside a supermarket, the attack was uploaded to facebook along with the the words : ‘This is how we deal with the beggars on the street. He is not even a beggar we spray them to death”.

Days later he was found dead, Police say these circumstances are non-suspicious.

The shocking video was shared on Facebook of Micheal Cash outside of Tesco Express in Normanby.

Despite Cash being found dead days later police refuse to link the death to this incident after his body was found in Eston Cemetery in Middlesbrough on Wednesday afternoon.

Crime Scene Investigators could be seen in the bushes within the cemetery and quickly put a cordon in place.

It has been speculated that Cash killed himself following the incident, but until circumstances are known we will not be able to speculate.

Police have confirmed the death is not suspicious there it is our assumption the circumstances around the death are no longer being investigated.

Police have not formally identified the body but a member of Mr Cash’s family confirmed they were visited by detectives on Wednesday.

Police have asked people not to speculate on social media regarding the incident.

Cleveland Police have released a statement saying “The death of a man whose body was found in Eston Cemetery on Wednesday 12th September is not being treated as suspicious.

“The man who is believed to be aged in his 30s has not yet been formally identified.

“A post-mortem examination has been held and although the death is not being treated as suspicious police believe this man was the victim of a previous incident of assault which resulted in the man being sprayed with red paint.

“The incident occurred near to Tesco Express on the High Street in Normanby and was reported to police on Sunday 9th September.”

Detective Inspector Matt Hollingsworth said: “Police are aware of the speculation on social media regarding the cause of the man’s death but we are not linking the assault with his death.

“Officers are carrying out enquiries in relation to the assault outside of Tesco and would appeal for anyone with information or anyone who witnessed it to contact Cleveland Police on the non-emergency number 101 quoting 166668, or Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111 or www.crimestoppers-uk.org.”

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