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Let’s put a Freeze on Fraud #Tell2

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North Yorkshire Police has launched a new awareness campaign to help you avoid becoming a victim of fraud during the January sales and beyond.

“Freeze on Fraud” is designed to reach a whole range of residents, young and old alike, by stressing the very real dangers of being actively targeted by fraudsters on a daily basis.

At this bargain-mania time of year especially, there comes with it a heightened level of risk when shopping online and making internet bookings for things such as holidays and concerts.

It is also known that fraudsters prey on individuals who have made New Year’s resolutions to find love using dating websites.

There are also a whole host of dastardly telephone scams doing the rounds with the sole aim of extracting your cash by whatever means necessary, including making sickening threats to vulnerable and elderly people.

During the campaign you will hear from real people who have suffered at the hands of fraudsters.  Their stories show just how shockingly easy it is to become a victim.

Our campaign will also feature on ATMs across the county and newspaper websites throughout January, encouraging members of the public to be aware of fraud and make sure they know what they can do to help prevent falling victim to fraudsters.

North Yorkshire Police is determined to tackle the ever-growing issue of personal fraud, which is a key priority for the force.

Let’s put a Freeze on Fraud this January and for the year ahead.

Detective Inspector Jon Hodgeon, North Yorkshire Police’s Head of Fraud and Economic Crime

“Fraud is a significant problem here in North Yorkshire with residents losing tens of thousands of pounds to very calculated and cold-hearted criminals.

“Every year we see a spike in such incidents during January to coincide with the post-Christmas sales, which are increasingly conducted online.

“This is why we are using the Freeze on Fraud campaign to make people aware of the serious risks they are taking, often without realising the imminent danger right in front of them, at their finger-tips or at the other end of a telephone line.

“It is important to realise that anyone can be a victim of fraud. Those committing the offence do not discriminate by social status or geographical location. People of all ages are affected, including those who are financially sophisticated and confident, but within this range of victims, older people are particularly vulnerable due to their reduced capacity to identify this as an attempted criminal act.

“Older people are also more at risk of scams such as doorstep fraud, bank and card account takeover, pension liberation and investment fraud. Whereas younger people are more likely to fall victim relating to online purchase fraud, albeit the older generations are catching up due to increased internet usage.

“In general, the most common enabler used in fraud is the telephone, followed by online sales and email.

“Identity crime continues to be a key enabler across all fraud types and, with the increase in cyber-enabled fraud, it has become more prevalent in terms of volume and use.

“In North Yorkshire, however, the top most reported frauds are computer software fraud and online shopping and auctions. Cheque, plastic card and online banking do not feature as prominently in our area in comparison to the national picture, but always keep on your guard.”

16 brrrrrrrrilliant tips to help put a Freeze on Fraud

1) Whether it’s at the online checkout, tradespeople at your door or a letter or phone call you have received, it’s always vital to check the legitimacy of the company or the individual you are dealing with. Don’t ever be afraid to ask a question and to get them to prove their credentials. If they are genuine they will provide the necessary identification and information. If you are not satisfied it’s best to report your concerns to the police.

2) Crucially, always keep at the forefront of your mind not to give away your personal information no matter what. This includes your name, home address, bank details, email address or phone number.

3) Many frauds start with a phishing email. Remember that banks and financial institutions will not send you an email asking you to click on a link and confirm your bank details. Do not trust such emails, even if they look genuine. You can always call your bank using the phone number on a genuine piece of correspondence, website (typed directly into the address bar) or the phone book to check if you’re not sure.

4) Please make sure your computer has up-to-date anti-virus software and a firewall installed. Ensure your browser is set to the highest level of security notification and monitoring to prevent malware issues and computer crimes.

5) Be extremely wary of the post, phone calls or emails offering business deals out of the blue. If an offer seems too good to be true, it probably is. Always question it.

6) Always shield your PIN and be vigilant at cash machines and checkouts. Don’t ever send it over the internet or disclose it to anyone. Your bank or the police will never phone or email you to ask you to disclose it.

7) Shop only on secure websites. Before submitting card details, look for a padlock or an unbroken key symbol on your web browser. Also, check that the internet browser address changes from ‘http’ to https’ to indicate you have a secure connection.

8) When you are talking to people on social media, chat rooms or dating sites, make sure you know who it is you are talking to and never ever pass on personal or financial information to them online.

9) Sign-up to Verified by Visa or MasterCard Secure Code whenever you are given the option while shopping online. This involves you registering a password with your card company and adds an additional layer of security to online transactions with signed-up retailers.

10) Check receipts against bank statements regularly. If you find an unfamiliar transaction contact your bank or card company immediately.

11) Shred or completely destroy all documents which contain personal details and don’t keep such documents in your car or handbag.

12) When buying tickets online, check with the venue to find out when they are being released and sent out. Also check that you know the geographic address of the website company and that they have a working landline phone number. Make sure there is a refund policy in case something goes wrong.

13) When dealing with tradespeople never hand over a cash deposit. Be wary of special offers or warnings about your home and don’t agree to a trader starting any work straight away. Take time to consult with someone you trust for a second opinion, and speak to friends, family or neighbours before making any decision.

14) Don’t be rushed into making a decision you are not comfortable with. Fraudsters use pressure to force you to make an unwise decision. This could be by saying it is a limited time offer or that money is needed due to an emergency. Be confident to tell people that you require time to think over a decision and then discuss it with people you trust.

15) Get up-to-date. Many national media outlets often broadcast fraud trends and information and advice. Check out BBC Radio 4’s “You and Yours” consumer affairs and Finance programmes. The Guardian and Telegraph online Finance and Technology sections are also very useful sources of information surrounding fraud.

16) Scammers are quick to identify new ways of conning people out of their money. You must report all incidents of fraud to Action Fraud UK and not to the police. Call Action Fraud on 0300 123 2040 or report fraud online at www.actionfraud.police.uk.

For more information and crime prevention advice regarding fraud, please go to the North Yorkshire Police website www.northyorkshire.police.uk/freezeonfraud

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Fancy being locked in a haunted police cell?

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Forget Halloween Fancy a spooky night of fun, locked in a haunted cell for 24 hours to raise money for charity. Then we have an event that is right up your street.

Following on from the success of the PC Edward Walker Tour, Jules Berry a DDO with the Met Police is back with her spooky haunted cell idea to raise money for COPS UK and WMP History Museum, That is exactly what you can do this Feb.

Met Police Detention Officer Jules Berry is arranging the whole event in partnership with the WMP History Museum and is hoping to raise thousands of pounds for charity.

The event will take place on the 8th and 9th of February 2019, but be quick as places are limited.

Unfortunately, Police Hour will no longer be live streaming this event to our 2.5 Million Followers, But we hope our readers can still attend and support this event.

Need we say any more, Simply watch this video then sign up

Hats off to Kerry Blakeman for his fantastic advertorial.

The event is being held to support the restoration of the West Midlands Police Museum and COPS UK.

About COPS

COPS is the UK charity dedicated to helping the families of police officers who have lost their lives in relation to their duty, to rebuild their lives.

Since being founded in 2003, they have helped hundreds of families shattered by the loss of their police officer.

They aim to ensure that surviving family members have all the help they need

to cope with such a tragedy and they remain part of the police family.

What COPS do?

COPS is a peer support charity, enabling Survivors from around the UK to support other Survivors in practical ways. They arrange local and national events that enable Survivors to build friendships and bonds that support them through the good times and bad.

Families are rightly proud of their officer and COPS to help ensure that they remain part of the police family.

What about the WMP History?

The West Midlands Police Museum at Coventry was opened in 1959 and celebrates the history of Coventry City Police which existed between 1839 & 1969, before becoming part of Warwickshire and Coventry Constabulary and in 1974, West Midlands Police.

The site at Sparkhill has been operating since 1995 when it moved there from the force’s training facility at Tally Ho! where it been operating as a CID training facility since the mid 1970s. Several of the exhibits had originated from the old Forensic Science Service laboratory when it moved from Newton Street to Gooch Street.

The Sparkhill museum contains items of policing memorabilia and old records from the West Midlands Police predecessor forces of Birmingham City Police, Walsall Borough Police, Dudley Borough Police, Wolverhampton Borough Police and West Midlands Constabulary. Some records are also held of Staffordshire County Police and Worcestershire officers as parts of those forces now fall within the West Midlands Police area.

You can also drop an email [email protected] to sign up, you must raise a minimum of £250 sponsorship.

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What on earth is happening in Salisbury? Two people fall seriously ill

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Emergency Services have launched a major incident after two people have fallen ill in Salisbury.

Officers have placed a cordon around Prezzo Restaurant after a man and woman were taken ill.

Police have declared a major incident. Police do not believe this is linked to Novichok.

Police received a call from the ambulance service to Prezzo restaurant, in High Street, at approximately 6.45pm. Two people, a man aged in his 40s and a woman aged in her 30s, had become unwell.

Due to recent events in the city and concerns that the pair had been exposed to an unknown substance, a highly precautionary approach was taken by all emergency services.

Both were taken to Salisbury District Hospital and were clinically assessed. We can now confirm that there is nothing to suggest that Novichok is the substance. Both people remain in hospital under observation.

The major incident status has now been stood down.

At this stage it is not yet clear if a crime has been committed and enquiries remain ongoing.

Salisbury District Hospital remains open as usual.

A cordon will remain in place around Prezzo at this time as part of ongoing routine enquiries. All other areas that were cordoned off will now be reopened.

We’d like to thank the public for their patience as a result of the impact of this incident.

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Homeless man covered in red spray paint found dead in cemetery days later

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Police say they are not linking the incidents together despite a vile video being uploaded to Facebook just days before.

Sick thugs covered the homeless man in red paint as he sat outside a supermarket, the attack was uploaded to facebook along with the the words : ‘This is how we deal with the beggars on the street. He is not even a beggar we spray them to death”.

Days later he was found dead, Police say these circumstances are non-suspicious.

The shocking video was shared on Facebook of Micheal Cash outside of Tesco Express in Normanby.

Despite Cash being found dead days later police refuse to link the death to this incident after his body was found in Eston Cemetery in Middlesbrough on Wednesday afternoon.

Crime Scene Investigators could be seen in the bushes within the cemetery and quickly put a cordon in place.

It has been speculated that Cash killed himself following the incident, but until circumstances are known we will not be able to speculate.

Police have confirmed the death is not suspicious there it is our assumption the circumstances around the death are no longer being investigated.

Police have not formally identified the body but a member of Mr Cash’s family confirmed they were visited by detectives on Wednesday.

Police have asked people not to speculate on social media regarding the incident.

Cleveland Police have released a statement saying “The death of a man whose body was found in Eston Cemetery on Wednesday 12th September is not being treated as suspicious.

“The man who is believed to be aged in his 30s has not yet been formally identified.

“A post-mortem examination has been held and although the death is not being treated as suspicious police believe this man was the victim of a previous incident of assault which resulted in the man being sprayed with red paint.

“The incident occurred near to Tesco Express on the High Street in Normanby and was reported to police on Sunday 9th September.”

Detective Inspector Matt Hollingsworth said: “Police are aware of the speculation on social media regarding the cause of the man’s death but we are not linking the assault with his death.

“Officers are carrying out enquiries in relation to the assault outside of Tesco and would appeal for anyone with information or anyone who witnessed it to contact Cleveland Police on the non-emergency number 101 quoting 166668, or Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111 or www.crimestoppers-uk.org.”

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