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Police are content Corrie McKeague is not in the landfill areas which have now been searched.

Corrie Mckeague has been missing since September

olice have completed the search of a second area at the Milton landfill site as part of their inquiry to find Corrie McKeague.

The search of an extended area of Cell 22 began on October 23, 2017.

Although the data available indicated this was the next most likely area where Corrie might be found following the original 20-week search of the cell earlier this year, there was no trace of him.

Police are content Corrie is not in the landfill areas which have now been searched.

The inquiry team has identified all the other possible locations where waste has been deposited from the area in Bury St Edmunds known as the ‘horseshoe’ and there are no further realistic search opportunities at this time.

As previously stated, the nature of waste disposal and its movement is not an exact science.

The primary hypothesis – that Corrie ended up in the waste disposal process – was endorsed by a review of the investigation undertaken by the East Midlands Special Operations Unit (EMSOU).

The EMSOU officers who conducted the review were given access to all of the information they needed to conduct a thorough review, including all of the witness statements.

Following the conclusion of the landfill search site today the investigation into Corrie’s disappearance on September 24, 2016, will continue.

He was last seen on CCTV entering a loading bay in the ‘horseshoe’ following a night out.

CCTV in Bury St Edmunds town centre has already been viewed up to 4pm on 24th September 2016 and Corrie has not been seen to leave.

However, we will continue to scrutinise the other theories in order to try to establish and understand what may have happened to Corrie.

Detective Superintendent Katie Elliott said: “We are still committed to continuing with the inquiry. There are a number of other theories about what could have happened to Corrie and we are continuing to test the evidence to help us understand what happened to Corrie, which will assist in providing answers to his family.

“We feel it is important to explain to the family what we are doing, so they have the opportunity to understand and question what we have done, and why we have done it.

“We are acutely aware of the immense strain the last 15 months has placed upon Corrie’s loved ones. We want them to be confident we are doing everything that it is practical for us to do as we strive to find Corrie.”

Suffolk Constabulary would like to thank FCC Environment, owner of the Milton landfill site, for its support and co-operation during the inquiry.

The total amount searched in this second phase of the search was 2,867.5 tonnes.

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