editorial

Police Officer driving at 140MPH shows how officers protect us each and every day​. Thank You

A Police Officer who released footage of his police car responding to an emergency incident on blue lights shows just how far our police officers have to drive to ensure we are protected.

These are professional advanced drivers who do not take unnecessary risks, there should be no shame in sharing just how far or fast police officers have to drive to respond to 999 incidents.

After all they are responding to protect a person who needs help.

SGT Harry Tangye who won the best police twitter account at the 2016 Police Twitter Awards released the video on Twitter recorded by his crewmate showing the car driving at 140MPH to a 999 incident that required an immediate response.

Personally here at Police Hour we believe and support Harry’s tweet as it shows the extent officers have to drive to keep us safe, they are very professional and highly trained officers.

Those that call out the video have missed the key issue here and we can assure you that isn’t the speed that the car is doing or being a brag about how fast they had to respond but in fact, the everyday risks very professional and highly trained officers undertake as part of their role to keep us safe.

As members of the public, we expect the police to be with us within moments of putting the phone down, we complain when the police take hours to get there surely we cannot complain when officers are pushing the limits to ensure they arrive quickly to ensure we are safe.

Road traffic officers have to push to these limits every day when responding to Terror Incidents, Armed Incidents, Crashes and life and death incidents they do it because they are trained, they care and they risk their lives to ensure you are safe.

Harry has now released a statement saying he does “regret” posting the video of his car travelling at 140MPH en route to a 999 call out. Explaining his decision on his blog. He said “I do regret the tweet, as it does tend to glamorise speed which is inappropriate and unintentional.

“I try to mix my tweet content to be fun, humorous, create debate, and to show the public what our everyday work is. This means I hopefully have the public with me when I want to discuss the more educational and advisory aspects of policing. I thank those who have supported me on this issue.”

Harry Said “This may seem like an unnecessary speed to many, however officers undertake numerous extensive driving courses which are refreshed regularly in order to keep them to the highly trained standards required for the role they do.

“I myself am a Advanced Police driver, a VIP driver and a Pursuit Tactics advisor. I was a Senior Investigating Officer for serious and fatal road traffic collisions for 15 years.

“I am a Tactical Pursuit and Containment qualified officer and have over 20 years’ experience of driving on full front line shifts. The geography of our Force area means we have to cover vast distances and this is always judged against the potential risk to the persons calling for police assistance, and the other motorists we pass along with ourselves.

“We can make up considerable time on empty motorways between locations. General guidance by our driver training department is to keep top speeds to no more than double the speed limit. I would say however, I do regret the tweet, as it does tend to glamorise speed which is inappropriate and unintentional.

“I try to mix my tweet content to be fun, humorous, create debate, and to show the public what our everyday work is. This means I hopefully have the public with me when I want to discuss the more educational and advisory aspects of policing. I thank those who have supported me on this issue.

Surely we expect the police to be transparent at all times, with honesty and integrity so why should officers have to hide the speed they are travelling at to ensure we are safe?

Just take a moment to think about that before you criticise Harry.

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