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Unilad Meet the Paedophile Hunters Dark Justice



Meet the Paedophile Hunters as Unilad follow two Newcastle Lads Scott and Calum as they track down paedophiles.

With little support from the Police and little being done to prevent online grooming Dark Justice explore and showcase the work they have been doing to prevent online sexual offenders.

Dark Justice is looking for better ways to work with the police across the UK and share intelligence.

The documentary showcases a number of the work Dark Justice have carried out to bring offenders to justice across the UK and ends with an offender being arrested within Newcastle Train Station.

Who are Dark Justice?

Dark Justice is an online group that are often compared to as vigilantes who pose as underage children to trap paedophiles.

They are far from the image of vigilantes within the way they operate, They are very professional and passionate about putting child sex offenders behind bars. They operate in a completely different way to other Paedophile hunters online. Dark Justice is arguably an asset to British policing.

The people they catch aren’t even on the Police radar, No intelligence exists about them and often it is the first offence that person has ever been charged with.

Dark Justice is often mentioned in Locker rooms across UK Police Stations as the officers on the ground do have an admiration for the work they are doing.

Although they mainly operate within the Northumbria, Cleveland and Durham Police areas they are not afraid to investigate Paedophiles further afield.

Detectives within CID rooms welcome them because the ethical techniques Dark Justice use are able to be admitted into court as evidence.

They don’t comprise any legal proceeding they are involved with and never name anyone involved in investigations until they have been charged.

Dark Justice is basically handing over the perfect investigation to detectives gift wrapped or in policing terms a boxed off job. That requires little further work and investigation.

They operate without the limitations of red tape that officers have to stay within and have the ability to save detectives thousands of pounds in costs to carry out detailed forensic examinations of devices. They are basically caught red handed

They are basically caught red handed and interviewed on camera the moment they are meet and admit their crimes on film. Something that would be unlawful for a police officer todo.

Having recently met Dark Justice, Police Hour discovered their passion for keeping child sex offenders off the streets. Unlike others, they aren’t all about the fame. Dark Justice simply noticed that the police were being cut back and didn’t have the funding to tackle online grooming within the North East.

Dark Justice is actually a self-funded project to catch child sex offenders with a lot of the money to fund their work coming out of their own pockets. The truth is they are just two ground geordie lads looking to take offenders off the streets.

They spoke very passionately about their objections to cuts to policing and that is where we believe that Dark Justice offers a lot more to policing than meets the eye.

Although Dark Justice does not currently work directly with police forces and we are sure that seniors officers will instantly disagree with us on ethical terms and instantly shut down the idea.

But we believe that Police Forces across the UK should embrace and work closely with the likes of Dark Justice. Simply because of the lawful way in which they operate.

We pay drugs dealers for information

Many forces pay drug dealers and convicted criminals for information, In fact we paid £22 Million to police informants for crimes such as drug dealing. We are talking about school children being raped and sexually assaulted after being groomed on services such as Whats App and Facebook.

We believe forces should reach out to Dark Justice in the same way and consider ways of working with groups such as Dark Justice. We know their work has already resulted in 63 arrests with 29 of those convicted and the remaining currently on police bail.

15 of those 29 so far convicted were handed custodial sentences due to the hard work and efforts of Dark Justice.

But what about the strains of evidence that aren’t strong enough but simply added to the bigger picture that would build on police intelligence.

This would enable forces to greatly gather further and better intelligence on child sex offenders without all the red tape.

The police have a lot to learn from the modern day tactics being used by Dark Justice that would greatly enrich the investigations of online child sex offenders.

Hindering investigations.

You are going to get your old school and detectives who say leave police work to the police. I’m sure Dark Justice have faced this a number of times when old school bobbies but the truth is the police Don’t have the time, resources or the money to intercept child sex offenders before an offence happens.

Within our field, we have certainly heard these negative comments surrounding Dark Justice However they are very professional within the way they operate. They do not use entrapment and online sex offenders always engage within a conversation with them first.

Dark Justice uses intervention to prevent offences from happening. It is a reality that the police are powerless to prevent child sex offenders from grooming children online before an offence happens.

A Cleveland Police Spokesperson told Police Hour: “Whilst police investigate information supplied by vigilante groups we cannot condone such actions – they may have the best of intentions, but members of these groups put themselves at risk and they can also put vulnerable victims at risk whilst disrupting police investigations. Police advise people not to carry out their own enquiries, but to contact them and raise their concerns with the authorities who can investigate thoroughly and in the safest possible way.”



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Policing and Ethics Panels… are they really working?



Every Police force across the U.K. has a code of ethics and a panel to go with it.

They meet every six weeks and talk about ethics within policing. These panels expect the highest standards of behaviour and conduct from the police officers and staff within the force.

Surely these code of ethics should also be a reflection and followed by those independent people who sit on these panels.

They expect the highest standards from those officers, but we as members of the public should also expect the highest standards of behaviour from those who sit within these panels.

We should expect these standards to be adhered to within everyday life and within the online social media world. After all if the code of ethics panels cannot adhere to these basic standards how can we expect others too.

What are the code of ethics?

The Code of Ethics is a code of practice for the principles and standards of behaviour that applies to the police service in England and Wales.

The code of ethics applies to anyone working on behalf of the police service which actually also includes those members of the panels which in some cases don’t seem to follow their own ethics.

We expect from those who are working within the police service as a basic. .

  • Acting with honesty and integrity, fairness and impartiality.
  • Treating members of the public and their colleagues with respect.
  • Not abusing their powers and authority.
  • Acting in a manner that does not discredit or undermine public confidence in the police service.

Making Ethical Decisions

The Code of Ethics promotes the use of the National Decision Model (NDM) to help embed ethical reasoning in accordance with policing principles and expected standards of behaviour.

The model allows people to be more questioning of the situations confronting them, more challenging of themselves and better able to make ethical and effective decisions.

The model places the Code of Ethics at the centre of all decision making.

This reminds those in the policing profession that they should consider the principles and expected standards of behaviour set out in the Code at every stage of making decisions.

The NDM is inherently exible. It can be applied to spontaneous incidents or planned operations, by an individual or teams of people, and to operational and non-operational situations.

It can also be expanded as appropriate for specialist and other areas of policing. The NDM also works well for reviewing and debrie ng decisions and actions.

In every case the elements of the NDM stay the same, but users decide for themselves which questions and considerations they apply at

each stage.

Understanding, practising and using the NDM helps people develop the knowledge and skills necessary to make ethical, proportionate and defensible decisions in all policing situations.

In a fast-moving incident, the main priority of decision makers is to keep in mind the principles and standards set out in the Code of Ethics.

You are not expected to know the Code of Ethics word for word. What is expected is that you apply the intent of the Code to your decisions and ask yourself questions such as:

• Is my decision in line with the principles and expected behaviours outlined in the Code of Ethics?

• Will this action or decision re ect well on my professionalism and policing generally?

• Would I be comfortable explaining this action or decision to my supervisor?

• Would I be prepared to defend this action or decision in public?

Independent Ethical Panels

We understand the value that ethics panels add to all levels of the police service but do they add anything to policing? Are they just talking and achieving nothing? Some would say they are an invaluable resource.

It could be argued that some members of these independent ethical panels aren’t adhering to the values of the purpose of the ethical panels, some are publicly acting in a way to deliberately undermine public confidence in the police service to achieve and follow their own agenda publicly targeting police officers and members of the public in a way that is verging on the boundaries of Harassment and malicious communications all in the name of Ethical policing.

These members are going unchallenged because they believe they are simply above the law when it comes to Ethical Policing and we have to questions the motives for these people wanting to be on Ethical Panels.

Members of these panels are not acting honestly, with integrity, fairness and impartiality these panels.

So we would question the direct ethics of these ethical policing panels.

And ask ourselves are they worth the money spent on them?

Do they just create problems that don’t exist? Are they overthinking the whole thing?

Or are they adding value to the service, valuable change and meaningful discussions?

We know that many members of Ethical Panels are adhering to these standards and do have the right intentions but it is now your challenge to ensure other members no longer go unchecked.

Tweet views to @PoliceHour



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Man arrested after woman shot in East Sussex



A has been arrested after shooting a pregnant woman and one other person, through the windows of a house, in St Leonard’s in East Sussex, at around 8pm tonight.

The area around Bexhill Road was on lockdown with residents reporting on social media that they had been told to stay at home and lock their doors.

One man has been arrested and is in custody.



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Millions targeted in HMRC tax fraud scam doing the rounds #Tell2



Police are urging residents to be alert for telephone scams following reports that a number of residents have been contacted by a caller claiming to be from the tax office, HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC), this week.

Fraudsters are typically contacting the elderly, intimidating victims with threats of arrest for alleged outstanding debts or unpaid taxes in their name.

Police are thanking those who have reported the incidents and remind members of the public that HMRC will never make phone calls, use text messages or email to tell you about a tax rebate or penalty and will never ask for payment in this way.

For more information on this type of crime do visit:

Alternatively, report incidents of fraud to Action Fraud using their online reporting tool or by calling 0300 1232040.



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