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Facebook Fraudster Gemma Badley who conned vulnerable people out of money escapes jail

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Gemma Badley the Facebook Fraudster who conned vulnerable people out of hundreds of pounds has escaped jail, she was only caught when she attempted to use one of Psychic Sally’s fan’s details to take out a £500 payday loan.

Badley took on the identity of Physic Sally to fuel a gambling and alcohol addiction. Cleveland Police found boxes of alcohol at the home of jobless Badley’s Hartlepool. She had bought the alcohol over the internet with her innocent victim’s money.

She targeted vulnerable people who wanted contact with those they had recently lost, looking for answered they turned to who they believed was Psychic Sally some paid her £10,00 a time others went further and shared their banking details.

Cleveland Police discovered that she had taken £750 from a victim’s bank account and added it straight into an 888.com gambling account.

HSBC bank launched an investigation into the disappearance of the money with her lawyer Neil Taylor saying: “It wouldn’t have taken any great detective work to work out where that money had been put in”

The solicitor added Badley had defied a speech impediment to bag a good job, but an “addictive personality” lead her down a spiral of despair.

“She was a young girl who found herself a good job who, for whatever reason, finds herself short of money and very sadly turned to gambling on the internet,” added Mr Taylor.

“(That) gambling addiction has caused her to lose her job, lose her home and caused her to be in rent arrears.”

While Badley was struggling on just £500-month after losing her job she hatched her plan to become Psychic Sally scamming people out of hundreds of pounds.

She would go on to claim that she was the real star and would offer customers readings from as little as £10 once the money was in her bank she would simply block the customer on facebook so they could not contact her again.

Sally Morgan has said that they believed at first it was a bit of a joke but things got out of hand and frightening when she was doing it in her name and Cleveland Police did not want to know and refused to investigate the incident saying “At first we thought it was a bit of a joke but it got quite frightening that she was able to do this in my name and no one wanted to know.”

“It was a bit scary what she was doing. We put pictures on Facebook and within literally three minutes she had taken them and set up a new account.”

Sally Morgan’s business manager contacted the fake Sally Morgan and paid £20 in order to expose the fraud

Eventually, Sally Morgan’s business manager coughed up £20 to Badley for a “reading” in order to expose the fraud.

Once Badley was exposed she wrote a letter in which she confessed everything and requested her 19 other offences be taken into consideration during sentencing.

Neil Taylor told the court that Badley understands that she has done wrong and that she needs to be punished saying “She understands what she has done is wrong and understands you have to punish her,”

Ian Goodman sentenced Badley to 24 weeks in jail suspended for 18 months, She was ordered to pay £790 in compensation and will be referred to the probation service.

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URGENT APPEAL: TAKES 2 seconds to Share £100K Reward to find Missing Corrie Mckeague

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Corrie Mckeague has been missing since September

We need your help to share this appeal far and wide, it only takes 2 seconds to share.

Corrie’s mum faces a second Christmas without knowing what has happened to her son or where he is.

If you know what happened to Corrie you must come forward, if you are hiding information about what has happened to Corrie.

Someone out there must know what happened to missing Corrie Mckeaue. Please share this as far and wide as possible one person out there must know what happened or where Corrie is.

We are urging you to share this appeal as far and as wide as possible. We must know what happened to Corrie and ensure those who know are brought to justice.

His mum and brothers are now facing their second Christmas without Corrie, having met his newborn baby. He has simply vanished.

A £100K reward has been offered to find missing Airman Corrie Mckeaue who has been missing since September 2016

23-year-old Corrie Disappeared after a night out in Bury St Edmunds in September 2016.

Police have now finished searching a landfill site for his body and have found no trace of Corrie within the landfill.

Officers say they have “no further realistic search opportunities” at the moment.

Businessman Colin Davey has now doubled his £50K reward to £100K.

Corrie’s mother Nicola Urquhart shared the news of the reward on the ‘Find Corrie’ Facebook page.

She is ‘begging anyone with information’ to come forward.

“Today, Colin Davey has increased the reward for information that leads to Corrie being found to £100,000.

“I would fail miserably if I tried to find the words that describe how I feel about Colin’s generosity. We can never thank him enough.

“I would beg ANYONE who has information no matter how small they think it may be to come forward. There may be someone out there that thought that because the police were so sure Corrie was in the landfill that there information was not important so never came forward. Please do it now.

“If you have already left details with the police but feel you have not been taken seriously or ‘re contacted, please get back in touch with them and ask what they have done and if they need further information from you.

“Corrie is not in the landfill so something else has happened. It is impossible to evaporate one of these theories we have had from the start now must be what has happened. Please please help me to get as much information to the police as possible. Someone out there knows something.”

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Four Iraqis win damages against MoD following their treatment during invasion

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Four Iraqi Citizens have won a high court damages against the Ministry of Defence.

The case was relating to their ill treatment and unlawful detention during the invasion of Iraq.

It was heard that they were unlawfully imprisoned and ill-treated by British armed forces.

The Judge ruled that all four would be entitled to compensation under the Human Rights Act with one of those men being awarded more than £30K.

After Mr Justice Leggatt’s ruling, lawyers said the result of the four test cases could form the basis of settlement of more than 600 unresolved claims in what is known as the Iraqi Civilian Litigation.

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‘Trauma Teddies’ police officers give our teddies to children they meet at incidents they attend

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A scheme where police officers give a cuddly toy to young children they meet during their daily patrols has been expanded across the North East.

The ‘Trauma Teddies’ scheme was launched in September but was started as a pilot operation that just covered part of Newcastle.

It involved knitted teddy bears being stored in patrol cars of response officers so that they can hand it to young children they meet when responding to incidents.

They could be handed to children who were involved in a road traffic collision or to a young child who had gone missing.

In the last month, the scheme has received an overwhelming response from local communities with more than a hundred teddies donated across the force.

Now the decision has been made to expand the pilot forcewide so patrol cars in Gateshead, Sunderland, North Tyneside and Northumberland will carry ‘Trauma Teddies’.

Chief Inspector Clare Langley has overseen the implementation of the scheme in Northern Area Command and said they could be a vital tool to help comfort young children.

She said: “This is a really fantastic scheme that has already had a number of success stories in Newcastle during the pilot.

“We have had an overwhelming response from the public and more than a hundred knitted teddies have been handed in by members of the public.

“It made sense to expand this scheme across the force as in the short time we have been running it we have found there is clearly an appetite to keep it going.

“Many of the children we come into contact with are scared, frightened and have never had any contact with the police before.

“Our officers are fantastic at comforting these young children but giving a child a teddy bear can be the thing that really builds a connection with them.”

Northumbria Police and Crime Commissioner, Dame Vera Baird QC, said: “I very much welcome this initiative to Northumbria. It recognises the effect a traumatic experience can have on a child and such a simple gesture is a step towards making a child’s experience less painful.

“Our officers sometimes have to attend devastating road traffic accidents or are called out to domestic incidents where a child has witnessed frightening scenes which result in seeing someone they know, and even love,
being taken away.

“A teddy won’t fix things but if it can help officers distract a child from what’s happening and offer them some comfort. I’m very thankful to everyone who has donated these bears – they will make a difference.”

Trauma Teddies were first introduced in Australia in a bid to comfort young children whose families had been left homeless by forest fires.

It was then adopted by the Red Cross to comfort young refugees before arriving in the UK when it was adopted by some police forces.

Victims First Northumbria suggested the scheme in the region and collected the first batch of teddies as well as producing a number of colouring books to hand out.

One of the early success stories includes a four-year-old boy who went missing and thought he was in trouble when he returned to see police at his house.

He was inconsolable until police handed him a teddy at which point his face “lit up” and he realised police weren’t just there to tell him off.

And last week a two-year-old boy was handed a ‘Trauma Teddy’ to comfort him after his mother was involved in an incident in North Shields and had to be spoken to by police.

Chief Inspector Langley said the teddies were really important to help show children at a young age that they could speak to their local police.

She added: “A lot of the work we do in schools and in our local communities is all about breaking down those barriers between children and police.

“We don’t want kids growing up with a negative view of the police and an opinion that our only role is to lock them up when they’ve done something wrong.

“This is about showing them that we are people to and that they can come to us whenever they have any concerns.”

Rachel Hardman, of Victims First Northumbria, said: “The Trauma Teddies appeal has been imperative in providing support to children across Northumbria.

“At VFN, we are keen to work with our partners to provide an excellent service to victims across Northumbria.

“Once a child receives a teddy and a safety colouring book, VFN receive a notification and we make contact with that family to provide support.

“This means that once the initial incident has been taken care of by our partners the Police, VFN can continue to provide independent support and coordinate a range of needs the family or indeed the child may have.

“We are really pleased and grateful for all the donations that have been received and are confident that the appeal will continue to be a success.”

Anyone who wants to help, or donate a bear, can get in touch by emailing either [email protected] or drop them off at their local station.

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