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45 Police Officers assaulted with 8 in Hospital after policing Notting Hill Carnival

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Police Pay

National shame as 45 police officers have been attacked over the bank holiday weekend while policing the Notting Hill Carnival 2016.

While thousands of people turned out to enjoy the sunshine and watch the Carnival a large number of people were arrested.

What is more shocking is 8 Police Officers are now in hospital and 45 officers were attacked over the weekend.

Commander Dave Musker, who was in charge of the policing operation at this year’s event, said: that “”45 incidents of assault against a police officer, for varying degrees of minor injuries and eight officers’ required anti-viral treatment at hospital as a result of being spat at. Of these 45 incidents, 25 assaults resulted in arrest.”

He confirmed he was proud of the officers saying “I am very proud of all the officers and staff who were deployed to Carnival this year. Once again they demonstrated their unwavering professionalism and bravery to ensure this spectacular celebration, that headlines the London event calendar, was not spoilt by a small minority wishing to use the Carnival a cover for committing crime.

“There were 15 reported violent injuries involving a knife or blade. Of these, two people suffered very serious injuries. Both victims are now stable conditions and in both cases arrests have been made and enquiries by officers continue.

“Whilst a total of 454 people were arrested at Carnival over Sunday and Monday, the highest number of arrests in more than a decade, there are contributing factors to this increase. The recent change in legislation around Psychoactive Drugs resulted in a high number of drug related arrests and high volume seizures, including Nitrous Oxide.

“A number of things were done differently this year, including our response to assaults against police officers. Our revised method of recording incidents, Operation Hampshire, has resulted in closer attention being paid to officer welfare, and a higher level of support being provided.

“An anti-social behaviour dispersal zone was also introduced and 47 people were issued with dispersal notices, meaning they had to leave the area and not return within a specified period of time.

“And we also trialled ‘Facial Recognition Technology’. This was the first phase of a trial of the technology and while no individuals were identified by the equipment, the trial has resulted in positive learning to take forward to gain a full understanding of how it can best be used in future.”

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Four Iraqis win damages against MoD following their treatment during invasion

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Four Iraqi Citizens have won a high court damages against the Ministry of Defence.

The case was relating to their ill0treatment and unlawful detention during the invasion of Iraq.

It was heard that they were unlawfully imprisoned and ill-treated by British armed forces.

The Judge ruled that all four would be entitled to compensation under the Human Rights Act with one of those men being awarded more than £30K.

After Mr Justice Leggatt’s ruling, lawyers said the result of the four test cases could form the basis of settlement of more than 600 unresolved claims in what is known as the Iraqi Civilian Litigation.

more follows.

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‘Trauma Teddies’ police officers give our teddies to children they meet at incidents they attend

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A scheme where police officers give a cuddly toy to young children they meet during their daily patrols has been expanded across the North East.

The ‘Trauma Teddies’ scheme was launched in September but was started as a pilot operation that just covered part of Newcastle.

It involved knitted teddy bears being stored in patrol cars of response officers so that they can hand it to young children they meet when responding to incidents.

They could be handed to children who were involved in a road traffic collision or to a young child who had gone missing.

In the last month, the scheme has received an overwhelming response from local communities with more than a hundred teddies donated across the force.

Now the decision has been made to expand the pilot forcewide so patrol cars in Gateshead, Sunderland, North Tyneside and Northumberland will carry ‘Trauma Teddies’.

Chief Inspector Clare Langley has overseen the implementation of the scheme in Northern Area Command and said they could be a vital tool to help comfort young children.

She said: “This is a really fantastic scheme that has already had a number of success stories in Newcastle during the pilot.

“We have had an overwhelming response from the public and more than a hundred knitted teddies have been handed in by members of the public.

“It made sense to expand this scheme across the force as in the short time we have been running it we have found there is clearly an appetite to keep it going.

“Many of the children we come into contact with are scared, frightened and have never had any contact with the police before.

“Our officers are fantastic at comforting these young children but giving a child a teddy bear can be the thing that really builds a connection with them.”

Northumbria Police and Crime Commissioner, Dame Vera Baird QC, said: “I very much welcome this initiative to Northumbria. It recognises the effect a traumatic experience can have on a child and such a simple gesture is a step towards making a child’s experience less painful.

“Our officers sometimes have to attend devastating road traffic accidents or are called out to domestic incidents where a child has witnessed frightening scenes which result in seeing someone they know, and even love,
being taken away.

“A teddy won’t fix things but if it can help officers distract a child from what’s happening and offer them some comfort. I’m very thankful to everyone who has donated these bears – they will make a difference.”

Trauma Teddies were first introduced in Australia in a bid to comfort young children whose families had been left homeless by forest fires.

It was then adopted by the Red Cross to comfort young refugees before arriving in the UK when it was adopted by some police forces.

Victims First Northumbria suggested the scheme in the region and collected the first batch of teddies as well as producing a number of colouring books to hand out.

One of the early success stories includes a four-year-old boy who went missing and thought he was in trouble when he returned to see police at his house.

He was inconsolable until police handed him a teddy at which point his face “lit up” and he realised police weren’t just there to tell him off.

And last week a two-year-old boy was handed a ‘Trauma Teddy’ to comfort him after his mother was involved in an incident in North Shields and had to be spoken to by police.

Chief Inspector Langley said the teddies were really important to help show children at a young age that they could speak to their local police.

She added: “A lot of the work we do in schools and in our local communities is all about breaking down those barriers between children and police.

“We don’t want kids growing up with a negative view of the police and an opinion that our only role is to lock them up when they’ve done something wrong.

“This is about showing them that we are people to and that they can come to us whenever they have any concerns.”

Rachel Hardman, of Victims First Northumbria, said: “The Trauma Teddies appeal has been imperative in providing support to children across Northumbria.

“At VFN, we are keen to work with our partners to provide an excellent service to victims across Northumbria.

“Once a child receives a teddy and a safety colouring book, VFN receive a notification and we make contact with that family to provide support.

“This means that once the initial incident has been taken care of by our partners the Police, VFN can continue to provide independent support and coordinate a range of needs the family or indeed the child may have.

“We are really pleased and grateful for all the donations that have been received and are confident that the appeal will continue to be a success.”

Anyone who wants to help, or donate a bear, can get in touch by emailing either [email protected] or drop them off at their local station.

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Woman arrested for driving stolen mobility scooter in reckless manner

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Police in Hartlepool came across an unusual incident while on a routine patrol of the town centre.

The Hartlepool Neighbourhood Police team managed to stop a stolen mobility scooter, now we aren’t too sure if a pursuit was given but if there was we are sure the footage would be unreal.

And we are fairly sure those cops responding to the incident won’t hear the end of this one back in the parade room for the next couple of years.

Anyways getting back to the story because this is, after all, a very serious incident, officers have described it as ‘one of the strangest jobs they’ve dealt with’.

Not only had the woman stole the mobility scooter she could not even drive it. Police Say she was spotted driving the Scooter in a reckless manner while under the influence of alcohol.

Cops managed to get their hands on her and lock her up but now they have the job of finding out whos scooter it is.

The cops admitted this was Perhaps one of the strangest jobs officers have dealt with in recent times.

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