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Murderer lived normal life for 32 years. Judge commended the 700 police officers and staff 

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A 64-year-old man has admitted the murder of Bath teenager Melanie Road almost 32 years after she died.
Christopher John Hampton, of Fishponds, pleaded guilty to one count of murder at Bristol Crown Court earlier today (11/4) and was sentenced to life imprisonment with a minimum term of 22 years.
At the hearing, Judge Andrew Popplewell said Hampton committed a “sexually motivated and brutal attack” on Melanie, resulting in her family being forced to suffer the agony of losing her in horrific circumstances for the past 32 years. He said this agony was compounded by the fact the killer had not been found. 
He commended the 700 police officers and staff involved in the investigation over the years and praised the leadership of Senior Investigating Officer Det Ch Insp Julie Mackay. He added the work of crime investigator Gary Mason had been the “backbone of the case”. 

Melanie, who was 17, was stabbed to death following a night out with friends in Bath on 8 June 1984. Her body was found in St Stephen’s Court, Lansdown, by a milkman and his son the following morning.

Melanie, who was 17, was stabbed to death following a night out with friends in Bath on 8 June 1984. Her body was found in St Stephen’s Court, Lansdown, by a milkman and his son the following morning.

Samples secured at the time were preserved and as forensic science evolved so did the development of the DNA profile.

Following mass swabbing, another DNA cycle was conducted in 2015.This identified a familial match – someone on the national database who was closely related to the person whose profile it was.

Resulting enquiries led to the arrest and charge of Christopher Hampton.

DCI Julie MacKay has been working on the case since 2009 – the 25th anniversary of Melanie’s murder.

She said: “Firstly, I want to pay tribute to Melanie’s family who have been searching for the truth since 1984.

“They’ve conducted themselves with the utmost dignity and composure. Their faith in us to find the person who murdered Melanie has certainly given us the extra drive to keep going.

They have been supported by the wider constabulary and our forensic providers, originally the Forensic Science Service and latterly Cellmark.

“Although Hampton has now admitted to murdering Melanie, he has spent more than 30 years living a lie, able to conceal his dark secret from all those around him.

“The breakthrough for us in this case was a re-run of familial DNA profiling in 2015. This process matches DNA recovered from Melanie’s clothing with DNA profiles on the national database and this can indicate whether there’s the possibility of a match with that person, their parents, siblings or children.

“Aside from the devastating impact this has had on Melanie’s friends and family, the after effects of this case have been felt by many in the Bath community. I’d like to take this opportunity to thank them and everyone who has assisted in our investigation since the mid-1980s.

“Without the hard work of the police officers in 1984 and the support of the public from then until today, the progress we have achieved would not have been possible.”

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BREAKING British and French scrambled to North Sea

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British and French jets have scrambled to the North Sea amid reports that Russian planes have entered the UK airspace.

The RAF Typhoon fighter jet is supporting Airbus Voyager plane deployed from Newcastle after 3pm today.

The French have also supported in the deployment supporting with a fighter jet.

In total four jets were seen over the North Sea on mapping.

The RAF has declined to comment on the situation describing it as an ongoing military operation.

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Fancy being locked in a haunted police cell?

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Forget Halloween Fancy a spooky night of fun, locked in a haunted cell for 24 hours to raise money for charity. Then we have an event that is right up your street.

Following on from the success of the PC Edward Walker Tour, Jules Berry a DDO with the Met Police is back with her spooky haunted cell idea to raise money for COPS UK and WMP History Museum, That is exactly what you can do this Feb.

Met Police Detention Officer Jules Berry is arranging the whole event in partnership with the WMP History Museum and is hoping to raise thousands of pounds for charity.

The event will take place on the 8th and 9th of February 2019, but be quick as places are limited.

Unfortunately, Police Hour will no longer be live streaming this event to our 2.5 Million Followers, But we hope our readers can still attend and support this event.

Need we say any more, Simply watch this video then sign up

Hats off to Kerry Blakeman for his fantastic advertorial.

The event is being held to support the restoration of the West Midlands Police Museum and COPS UK.

About COPS

COPS is the UK charity dedicated to helping the families of police officers who have lost their lives in relation to their duty, to rebuild their lives.

Since being founded in 2003, they have helped hundreds of families shattered by the loss of their police officer.

They aim to ensure that surviving family members have all the help they need

to cope with such a tragedy and they remain part of the police family.

What COPS do?

COPS is a peer support charity, enabling Survivors from around the UK to support other Survivors in practical ways. They arrange local and national events that enable Survivors to build friendships and bonds that support them through the good times and bad.

Families are rightly proud of their officer and COPS to help ensure that they remain part of the police family.

What about the WMP History?

The West Midlands Police Museum at Coventry was opened in 1959 and celebrates the history of Coventry City Police which existed between 1839 & 1969, before becoming part of Warwickshire and Coventry Constabulary and in 1974, West Midlands Police.

The site at Sparkhill has been operating since 1995 when it moved there from the force’s training facility at Tally Ho! where it been operating as a CID training facility since the mid 1970s. Several of the exhibits had originated from the old Forensic Science Service laboratory when it moved from Newton Street to Gooch Street.

The Sparkhill museum contains items of policing memorabilia and old records from the West Midlands Police predecessor forces of Birmingham City Police, Walsall Borough Police, Dudley Borough Police, Wolverhampton Borough Police and West Midlands Constabulary. Some records are also held of Staffordshire County Police and Worcestershire officers as parts of those forces now fall within the West Midlands Police area.

You can also drop an email [email protected] to sign up, you must raise a minimum of £250 sponsorship.

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What on earth is happening in Salisbury? Two people fall seriously ill

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Emergency Services have launched a major incident after two people have fallen ill in Salisbury.

Officers have placed a cordon around Prezzo Restaurant after a man and woman were taken ill.

Police have declared a major incident. Police do not believe this is linked to Novichok.

Police received a call from the ambulance service to Prezzo restaurant, in High Street, at approximately 6.45pm. Two people, a man aged in his 40s and a woman aged in her 30s, had become unwell.

Due to recent events in the city and concerns that the pair had been exposed to an unknown substance, a highly precautionary approach was taken by all emergency services.

Both were taken to Salisbury District Hospital and were clinically assessed. We can now confirm that there is nothing to suggest that Novichok is the substance. Both people remain in hospital under observation.

The major incident status has now been stood down.

At this stage it is not yet clear if a crime has been committed and enquiries remain ongoing.

Salisbury District Hospital remains open as usual.

A cordon will remain in place around Prezzo at this time as part of ongoing routine enquiries. All other areas that were cordoned off will now be reopened.

We’d like to thank the public for their patience as a result of the impact of this incident.

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