Connect with us

News

Police awarded £250k to launch unmanned aerial vehicles. 

Published

on

Surrey and Sussex Police have been awarded almost £250,000 to expand a trial to see how the use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) could help keep people safe and assist with the investigation of crime.

The Home Office has awarded the forces the money from the Police Innovation Fund, which rewards creative, collaborative and cost-saving projects aimed at transforming policing.

The funding will be used to purchase five more UAVs to use in Surrey and Sussex to see how they can be used to improve policing across the country.

UAVs can be used to gather evidence from the air, such as at the scene of road, rail or air crashes, can help with searches for missing or wanted people and can help to capture a broad picture of activities on the ground, such as the spread of flooding, the movement of people during public disorder or events at an armed incident.

A trial of a UAV at Gatwick Airport last year showed that the equipment could provide a faster, safer and cheaper alternative to officer-led patrols in some circumstances.

They can cover a distance seven times quicker than officers on foot and can be used in conditions where it is unsafe for helicopters to fly or officers to go, such as smoky environments or when hazardous chemicals or materials have been spilled.

With the new UAVs, officers will study the most effective ways the equipment can be used and draw up guides for other forces about their use in different conditions and environments.

They will also help develop a training package for officers so that they can be accredited to use the equipment and assess whether more forces should invest in the technology.

Assistant Chief Constable Steve Barry, whose portfolio includes the joint Operations department for Surrey and Sussex Police, said: “Some of the benefits have already been demonstrated during the relatively short period that we have had the equipment for.

“They can go to places where it is unsafe for officers and can gather evidence quickly that could be vital in an investigation or that could help us deploy officers to the right places at the right time, potentially allowing us to make life-saving decisions.

“This is not about providing cut-price policing but about using technology to enhance the way we work. UAVs could prove extremely useful during a range of incidents and I am delighted the extra funding from the Home Office means we can explore more closely exactly what they can do.”

Policing Minister Mike Penning said: “This year’s successful bid have once again demonstrated how well police forces can work together to come up with forward-thinking, creative and original projects.

“Crime has fallen by more than a fifth under this Government. By working together, utilising modern technology and embracing new ideas, the police can do their job even better.

“While we are not suggesting that UAVs should replace police officers in everyday situations, early findings of this work suggests new technology could transform the police’s response in certain difficult or dangerous situations.

“This year’s successful bids to the Police Innovation Fund will build upon the work we have already funded to further improve efficiency, save forces money and ultimately provide greater value and a better service for the taxpayer.”

The Police Innovation Fund was launched last year. Every force in England and Wales received a share of £50 million in 2014/15. Forces estimate projects supported to date by the Police Innovation Fund will have saved taxpayers almost £250m once they have been up and running for five years.

Comments

comments

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

You must be logged in to post a comment Login

Leave a Reply

News

Kerry Blakeman & CMPG in UK’s first motorway policing 360 video streamed LIVE

Published

on

Thousands of people viewed the amazing 360 footage from a police car responding to a live incident on the motorway.

While officers responded to the incident viewers followed live from inside of the police car with the latest 360 video which was streamed live.

The broadcast with the Central Motorway Policing Group (CMPG) was shared across Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Snapchat and went down very well with viewers.

In a number of Live videos shared insightful inside content which included LIVE motorway patrol and responding to an urgent incident on blue lights.

CMPG look after the region’s motorways alongside Highways England , 365 days a year 24/7 which includes West Midlands, West Mercia and Staffordshire.

The series of videos took viewers out on patrol with motorway cops, giving them a 360 degree look at how officers respond to an incident on the region’s motorways.

The 360 video streamed LIVE on Periscope for Twitter and received more than 13,100 views.

Operations Chief Inspector Kerry Blakeman, head of CMPG Dean Hatton and Highways England Manager Frank Bird also answered questions throughout the night from followers about a range of topics.

Viewers were also shown how the force is educating drivers on how drink, drugs and tiredness can have an effect on driver’s perception through a simulator funded by BDV recovery.

The award-winning close pass initiative was also demonstrated by PCs Hodson and Hudson who have been nominated for an award in this year’s police Twitter awards.

Members of the public really enjoyed the 360 interactive videos and commented on how fascinating the work was that is being carried out.

Throughout the course of the evening, the live broadcasts were viewed more than 92,000 times and the posts reached more than 266,000 people across all of the force’s social media networks.

Kerry Blakeman said: “We were overwhelmed with the support from members of the public and happy that we could show our followers an insight into how CMPG police the region’s motorways as well as a range of other things to keep the public safe.

“CMPG are a crucial resource that help us serve and protect the public 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

“We’ll continue to innovatively use social media to reach as many people as possible and share the good work that all our officers and staff do on a daily basis.”

Comments

comments

Continue Reading

News

Norfolk Police are scrapping the role of PCSO to save £1.6 Million

Published

on

Norfolk Police has today announced they are the first police force within the United Kingdom to scrap the role of PCSO.

Following one of the most extensive reviews within the history of Norfolk Police 150 police staff will be impacted.

As of a review which was launched in 2015 called ‘Norfolk 2020’ which looked as ways to develop the best way that the constabulary could deliver effective and efficient policing against unprecedented increases in complex crimes such as adult and child abuse, sexual offences and cyber-crime, while achieving £10m of savings before 2020.

In Conclusion of the report, it has now been announced that there was a need for investment in detective resources and creating facilities to match the increaase demand within the safeguarding and investigations command.

The complete removal of Police Community Support Officers impacting 150 staff resulting in a reduction in the neighbourhood resources.

Increasing the number of Frontline police officers by 81 and creating a pro-active policing model.

Finally 7 public enquiry offices front counter services along with the closure of 7 police stations across Norfolk.

Chief Constable Simon Bailey said: “These are radical plans which come at a critical time when the police service is facing unparalleled growth in complex crime together with reduced policing budgets.

“I’ve always been clear that meeting this challenge would be a turning point for the police service and that we would have to change the way we work in order to meet rising demand.

“The plans announced today, I believe, will deliver the most responsive police service for Norfolk, meeting the needs of our communities while protecting the most vulnerable people in our society.

“We must also ensure that the constabulary continues to deliver against the Norfolk Police and Crime Commissioner’s Police and Crime Plan and national policing demands.

“This has been the most extensive review in the force’s history. Adapting our existing structure was not an option which has resulted in plans that include the removal of the PCSO role within neighbourhood policing, reduction of Public Enquiry Offices and police station closures.

“These are difficult decisions and I’m acutely aware of the impact this will have on individuals directly affected and the communities they serve. Change on this scale is challenging but my priority as ever is to make sure we continue to deliver a responsive, relevant and viable police service for the people of Norfolk.”

Investment in detective resources and facilities to match increase and demand (Safeguarding and Investigations Command)

Norfolk has seen unprecedented increases in complex crimes. These crimes are of a serious nature; rape, sexual offences, adult and child abuse, indecent images, drugs and serious violence as well as cyber-crime.

The force has already invested heavily in the Safeguarding and Investigations Command in a bid to meet demand and the 2020 proposed changes will see officers and staff increased in this area by 31 FTE (9 Officers and 22 Staff)

To further improve the way these crimes are investigated, Norfolk’s new policing model will see two new investigation centres built in the east and west of the county. The new centres, based in Broadland Gate and Swaffham area, are due to be opened during 2019, and will have the necessary equipment and facilities to investigate these crimes more efficiently and effectively.

Centralising detective resources in two key locations will enhance the force’s ability to respond to increasing demand, ensuring complex enquiries sit with the right staff and therefore free-up frontline officers to focus on local policing.

The new buildings will also provide a more efficient and cost-effective solution in comparison to maintaining some of the force’s current estates.

Reduction in neighbourhood resources with removal of PCSO role

PCSOs have given outstanding service to communities in Norfolk since the role was introduced in 2002.

The force has reviewed everything that frontline officers and PCSOs can deliver, including their powers, duties, entitlements and the average annual cost of each, which is no longer significantly different.

PCSOs are not permitted to arrest, process or interview prisoners. The role also has limitations in respect of shift cover, use of police cars for pursuit or deployment to situations where there is likely to be a confrontation.

Therefore, the force plans to remove all 150 PCSO roles, with formal staff consultation beginning today (Thursday 19 October).

Increase in police officers and pro-active policing

The removal of PCSOs contributes to £1.6m in savings (equivalent to 43 full-time PCSOs) and means the force can increase frontline resources equating to 97 positions supporting frontline policing. These will be a mixture of officers (81) and staff (16).

These officers and staff would be deployed to neighbourhood and pro-active teams, enhancing the force’s ability to react to demand and offer pro-active policing.

Public Enquiry Office (front counter services) and police station closures

Changes are planned to the force’s estates, including a reduction in Public Enquiry Offices (PEOs).

During the review, assessments were carried out at all stations which offer front counter services into how frequently they were used by the public.

The proposal is to close seven out of the force’s ten PEOs. Stations affected are Dereham, Thetford, Cromer, Downham Market, Fakenham, Hunstanton and North Walsham. These stations will remain open as an operational base.

PEOs in Norwich, Great Yarmouth and King’s Lynn will remain open. However, Bethel Street will be closed on Sundays to reflect the low usage highlighted in the review.

The proposals also include police station closures at Acle, Coltishall (storage), Caister, Bowthorpe, Tuckswood (specials), Europa Way (storage) and North Lynn.

Officers and staff currently based at police stations in Attleborough, Holt and Reepham will be relocated to share premises with Norfolk Fire and Rescue Service.

Staff currently based at Sprowston and Swaffham will be relocated into the new investigation centres.

In the future, the force will also look to renovate or locally relocate Gorleston and Hurricane Way.

 

Comments

comments

Continue Reading

News

Ed Sheeran rushed to hospital after being knocked off bike in London

Published

on

Ed Sheeran has been to rushed to hospital after being knocked off his bike in London.

It is believed the singer has suffered a broken arm after he collided with a car in the capital city.

Ed took to Instagram ‘I’ve had a bit of a bicycle accident and I’m currently waiting on some medical advice, which may affect some of my upcoming shows. Please stay tuned for further news. Ed x’

Ed shared this with a picture of his guitar arm in a plaster cast and his other arm in a sling.

Comments

comments

Continue Reading
Advertisement Enter ad code here

Facebook

Trending