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Country's longest serving Police Constable retires today

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The Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) today, Friday, 13 February, bids farewell to the country’s longest serving police officer.

Born in Croydon in 1950, PC Robert ‘Bob’ Brown will be hanging up his hat after 47 years of service after he joined the Met as a police cadet in 1968.

Officers and colleagues formed a guard of honour outside Croydon police station, as Bob arrived for his final tour of duty in a vintage Morris Minor patrol car, which was in service during Bob’s first years as a police officer.

Having been a cadet for a year, which was a paid position at the time, Bob signed up as a trainee police constable a day after his 19th birthday on 17 February, 1969, and went on to spend the next 13 weeks at the Met’s Hendon training school.

Equipped with just a wooden truncheon and a whistle, Bob’s first posting was to West Hampstead, which is now part of Camden borough, where he spent 15 years on the local beat and crime squad.

Police technology was limited in 1969, and the main form of communication was via police boxes, made world-famous by Dr. Who, inside which was a telephone linked directly to the local station. Bob, like all officers at that time, had to ring in every two hours to report that he was safe and receive his duties for the next two hours.

Over the years, Bob served at stations in Harrow Road (Brent), Norbury, Addington and Sutton, before joining Croydon borough in the late nineties, where he has remained since.

He has also been involved in some of London’s most well-known cases and incidents, during a career that has spanned six decades. In 1973, Bob was one of the first officers on the scene when ‘Carlos the Jackal’ shot the then-Marks and Spencer boss, Joseph Sieff. He also supported the Met’s Special Branch during the arrest of Astrid Proll in 1978, who was part of the notorious revolutionary terrorist group, the Baader-Meinhoff gang.

In 1981, Bob faced bricks, bottles and burning building during the first Brixton riot, spending almost 72 hours on duty, save for a few short breaks. And over the years, he has been on duty at nearly every edition of one of London’s most colourful and vibrant events; the Notting Hill Carnival.

One of Bob’s darkest hours in the police service was on 8 February, 1994, when he responded to an armed robbery at a sub-post office in New Addington along with three other colleagues, including Sergeant Derek Robertson. Tragically, Sergeant Robertson was stabbed and murdered by the robbers. Bob bravely tried to give Derek first aid and watched on as medics tried in vain to save Derek’s life.

Last week, Bob was given one of the highest honours bestowed to police, when he received the Queen’s Police Medal. Bob attended the special ceremony at Buckingham Palace on Friday, 6 February, where he was awarded the medal by HRH, the Queen, in recognition of the 47 years he has dedicated to keeping London and Londoners safe.

In his retirement, Bob is planning to finally move away from London and will be heading to Yorkshire, where he plans to spend more time with his family in the area.

Croydon Borough Commander, Chief Superintendent Andy Tarrant said:

“Bob Brown has dedicated 47 years to public service and deserves all the recognition that goes with being the country’s longest serving police officer.

“It is only fitting that Bob should complete his career in the area that he was born in. An operational officer virtually to the end of his career, Bob will be missed by all his friends and colleagues.

“Croydon Police Station won’t be the same without Bob working here.”

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Urgent appeal takes 2 seconds to share to help find missing teen from York

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Please share this picture far and wide in hope that we can bring this 13-year-old back home . It only takes one person who shares this to spot her and be that’s difference

North Yorkshire Police is urgently appealing for information to help find a missing 13-year-old girl from York.

Elise Donoghue was last seen leaving her drama class at the York Theatre Royal on St Leonard’s Place just before 8pm on 19 October.

It’s thought Elise is without money or access to a mobile phone, and she is considered vulnerable due to her age.

Police enquiries have been ongoing to locate in York where it is known she has connections in the Fulford and Danesgate areas of the city.

There is also a possibility she headed to York Railway Station and boarded a train heading towards the north-west where she has friends in the Cheshire area. British Transport Police is assisting with enquiries.

Elise is described as white, 5ft 2in tall, blonde hair with a medium build. When she was seen she was wearing a grey hooded -top, black leggings, black Ugg boots and she carrying a shoulder bag.

Anyone who knows where Elise is or have seen a girl matching her description, please call North Yorkshire Police as a matter of urgency on 101, select option 1, and speak to the Force Control Room. Please quote reference number 12170187979.

If Elise you are reading this there is help and support available simply call or text 116000 they will be able to help you free and confidential.

Anyone who is currently missing from home Missing people are here to help you whenever you are ready; they can listen, talk you through what help you need, pass a message for you and help you to be safe. Call. Text. Anytime. Free. Confidential. 116000

They are also on hand to provide support for anyone who has been recently returned home having been missing.

 

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Police Dog Blue finds missing vulnerable teenager hidden in woodland undergrowth

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Police Dog Blue and his handler from the Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire and Hertfordshire (BCH) Dog Unit found a vulnerable teenager on Wednesday (October 18).

Officers were called to an address in Friday Bridge, Cambridgeshire at around 10.45pm after concerns were raised about a teenager who had gone missing.

Due to concerns for her welfare, PD Blue and his handler were also called to assist with the search.

German Shepherd Blue was deployed and began searching the local area. Whilst going down a nearby lane, Blue led his handler into an area of woodland and undergrowth.

It was here that the pair found the missing teenager. They were then able to provide immediate care before other officers arrived to take her home.

Inspector Iain Clark, who is the head of the BCH Dog Unit, said: “The officers had numerous places to search and I am glad PD Blue and his handler were able to provide assistance, which saw the teenager safely found within a short period of time.

“I am proud of their work and this is another great example of how the BCH Dog Unit can support other officers around the three counties.”

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Man admitted to racially harassing security guards at Student Halls

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Police Pay

A man who admitted racially harassing security guards at student halls has been served with a Community Order and a fine.

The 22-year-old from Luton pleaded guilty to two counts of racially aggravated harassment and criminal damage at Luton Magistrates’ Court yesterday (Thursday). The sentencing followed an incident in student halls in Luton on 24 September.

Hate Crime Sergeant James Hart said: “This was an unacceptable incident which was extremely distressing for the victims. We won’t tolerate hate crime in our county as everyone has the right to live free from fear or harassment.

“We hope this case will provide reassurance to victims that we take hate crime offences very seriously. Victims should not have to suffer such abuse and should feel comfortable reporting their experiences to the authorities.”

The man was handed a 12-week curfew with electronic tag and must pay £100 compensation to the victims.

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