Connect with us


Police officers and police staff on high alert following paris attacks



National Policing Lead for Counter Terrorism, Assistant Commissioner Mark Rowley has said “I wanted to make a short statement about some of the steps we are taking following the attacks in Paris last week and elsewhere.

The fight against violent extremism relies upon the active support of all communities

“The UK has been at a heightened level of threat from international terrorism for some years now. We have seen attacks in a number of countries, including France, Australia and Canada over the last few months, and in Belgium last night. We have also been working with security services to investigate a variety of threats and to disrupt a number of different plots to undertake attacks here. In 2014 there were 327 arrests for terrorist offences, that is a 32 % increase compared to the previous year.

“Last summer, the national threat level was raised to SEVERE. This means a terrorist attack here is highly likely. At that time we took a number of additional steps to protect communities and the public. This included, but was by no means limited to, additional armed patrols and more visible policing. We also held a counter-terrorism awareness week before Christmas to alert the public to the need for greater vigilance, and we offered specific advice where necessary.

“But, in light of the attacks in Paris last week, we have been reviewing, alongside our partners, our overall security posture. This is a further step in a process over a number of years of learning lessons from such events. For example, since the attack in Mumbai in 2008, we have enhanced our ability to respond effectively to a marauding terrorist attack by expanding our specialist firearms capability and improving the effectiveness of the response and joint working of all the emergency services. More generally we have continued to refine our plans and to enhance our capabilities to respond to a terrorist threat which has evolved and diversified.

“The global picture of terrorist activity does give us heightened concern about the risk to the Jewish community in the UK. We are seeing continuing anti-Semitic rhetoric from extremists and attacks on this community in France and elsewhere. In addition to our existing security measures, we are in dialogue with Jewish Community leaders about further actions that we will be taking, including more patrols in key areas.

“We remain alert to the vulnerabilities of other communities . Where we do have particular concerns, we make these known to those involved. For example, we continue to be alive to those who want to exploit the current situation and create fear in our Muslim communities, with whom we work closely, to offer our protection and reassurance.

“We are also considering what further measures we might put in place to enhance the security of police officers, given some of the deliberate targeting of the police we have seen in a number of countries across Europe and the world. Chief Constables across the country are reviewing how to strengthen the protection of their officers from such attacks. Our men and women on the frontline are used to confronting risk and danger and are well-trained in how to protect the public and themselves.

“The fight against violent extremism relies upon the active support of all communities, to look out for one another in their neighbourhoods and to continue to demonstrate a show of resolve that will eventually help to defy the poisonous ideology of extremists and deny them of opportunities to harm communities. We have been pleased and encouraged by the way that public has responded to appeals to report concerns or suspicious activity. The number of calls to the anti-terrorist and other hotlines has increased significantly over the last few months. This has made an important contribution to keeping the public safe.”



Continue Reading
Click to comment

You must be logged in to post a comment Login

Leave a Reply


Ambulance on an blue light call has been bricked in Newcastle



An ambulance crew have been left covered in shards of glass after the ambulance they travelled in was bricked.

This could have easily killed the driver and crew mate, a second ambulance had to be dispatched to the emergency call they could no longer attend.

The ambulance was traveling to a emergency call on blue lights and sirens when a brick was thrown at the windscreen of the ambulance.

Shocked crew members quickly pulled over and contacted police who have now launched an investigation.

The brick was aimed at the driver of the ambulance and without his quick thinking could have easily killed everyone on board.

Anyone who knows who is responsible for this horrific incident is asked to call police on 101.



Continue Reading


93-Year-Old Former Nurse Left In Hospital Corridor For Six Days



A 93 year old former nurse who was awarded an MBE for her services to the NHS was left in a hospital corridor for six days.

Enid Stevens was admitted to hospital after fracturing her spine while putting on her slippers at home.

When she arrived at A&E within St James Hospital in Leeds she never expected she have to wait six hours to be seen, places in a cubicle for another five hours in her urine-soaked clothes.

When Enid was finally given a ward bed, she imagined her ordeal was over and she could settle in to begin her medical treatment and recovery.

Then on the fourth night in the middle of the night at 2am she was woken up and moved to a corridor and kept there for six days.

Enid has admitted that what has happened to her was the ‘most degrading thing I’ve ever experienced’.

“I worked in the NHS from the age of 18 until I retired when I was 59 and every second of that time I was stood up on my feet – I didn’t get an MBE for nothing.

“But I’m not blaming the hospital or the staff there – you have to see it for yourself.

“The place was absolutely heaving – as soon as you ask a nurse to do one thing she’s stopped by someone else to do something else.”

She continued: “There used to be convalescent homes for elderly patients to recover after hospital treatment but the government got rid of them years ago.

“It’s all in A&E and there’s nowhere to put people except in the corridor. I’m just lucky I had my daughter to go backwards and forwards for everything.”

The nurse was awarded an MBE in 1983 for services to Seacroft Hospital in Leeds

She was admitted to hospital via Ambulance on the 6th March saying “I was soaked-through with urine in my clothes – it was like a nightmare.

“A nurse passed by so I asked her for some clean clothes but she never came back so I sat there for five hours wet-through.”

She was moved to a ward and then a corridor “That’s where I was left for six days.

“I was blocking the entrance to a doctor’s consultation room so I had to be shoved out of the way when the doctors brought patients’ families in to speak with them”

Her daughter Barbara Brook said: “Mum was right next to where they kept the apron and mask dispensers and the staff had to lean over her to get them.

“It was so upsetting for her – just awful really.”

Julian Hartley, Chief Executive of the Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, said: “Our communication with Mrs Stevens and her family during her stay should have been better and I sincerely apologise for her experience of care.

“Mrs Stevens was cared for in a non-designated bed space for longer than is acceptable and I am sorry that we weren’t able to move her to a dedicated bed space during her stay.

“Unfortunately there are pressures across the whole health and social care system which impact on our ability to discharge some patients who need further non-hospital support or care.”

“Regrettably we sometimes have to move some patients to a non-designated bed space for a temporary period of time.

“This is so we can meet the needs of patients who require closer clinical observation and monitoring.”



Continue Reading


Policing and Ethics Panels… are they really working?



Every Police force across the U.K. has a code of ethics and a panel to go with it.

They meet every six weeks and talk about ethics within policing. These panels expect the highest standards of behaviour and conduct from the police officers and staff within the force.

Surely these code of ethics should also be a reflection and followed by those independent people who sit on these panels.

They expect the highest standards from those officers, but we as members of the public should also expect the highest standards of behaviour from those who sit within these panels.

We should expect these standards to be adhered to within everyday life and within the online social media world. After all if the code of ethics panels cannot adhere to these basic standards how can we expect others too.

What are the code of ethics?

The Code of Ethics is a code of practice for the principles and standards of behaviour that applies to the police service in England and Wales.

The code of ethics applies to anyone working on behalf of the police service which actually also includes those members of the panels which in some cases don’t seem to follow their own ethics.

We expect from those who are working within the police service as a basic. .

  • Acting with honesty and integrity, fairness and impartiality.
  • Treating members of the public and their colleagues with respect.
  • Not abusing their powers and authority.
  • Acting in a manner that does not discredit or undermine public confidence in the police service.

Making Ethical Decisions

The Code of Ethics promotes the use of the National Decision Model (NDM) to help embed ethical reasoning in accordance with policing principles and expected standards of behaviour.

The model allows people to be more questioning of the situations confronting them, more challenging of themselves and better able to make ethical and effective decisions.

The model places the Code of Ethics at the centre of all decision making.

This reminds those in the policing profession that they should consider the principles and expected standards of behaviour set out in the Code at every stage of making decisions.

The NDM is inherently exible. It can be applied to spontaneous incidents or planned operations, by an individual or teams of people, and to operational and non-operational situations.

It can also be expanded as appropriate for specialist and other areas of policing. The NDM also works well for reviewing and debrie ng decisions and actions.

In every case the elements of the NDM stay the same, but users decide for themselves which questions and considerations they apply at

each stage.

Understanding, practising and using the NDM helps people develop the knowledge and skills necessary to make ethical, proportionate and defensible decisions in all policing situations.

In a fast-moving incident, the main priority of decision makers is to keep in mind the principles and standards set out in the Code of Ethics.

You are not expected to know the Code of Ethics word for word. What is expected is that you apply the intent of the Code to your decisions and ask yourself questions such as:

• Is my decision in line with the principles and expected behaviours outlined in the Code of Ethics?

• Will this action or decision re ect well on my professionalism and policing generally?

• Would I be comfortable explaining this action or decision to my supervisor?

• Would I be prepared to defend this action or decision in public?

Independent Ethical Panels

We understand the value that ethics panels add to all levels of the police service but do they add anything to policing? Are they just talking and achieving nothing? Some would say they are an invaluable resource.

It could be argued that some members of these independent ethical panels aren’t adhering to the values of the purpose of the ethical panels, some are publicly acting in a way to deliberately undermine public confidence in the police service to achieve and follow their own agenda publicly targeting police officers and members of the public in a way that is verging on the boundaries of Harassment and malicious communications all in the name of Ethical policing.

These members are going unchallenged because they believe they are simply above the law when it comes to Ethical Policing and we have to questions the motives for these people wanting to be on Ethical Panels.

Members of these panels are not acting honestly, with integrity, fairness and impartiality these panels.

So we would question the direct ethics of these ethical policing panels.

And ask ourselves are they worth the money spent on them?

Do they just create problems that don’t exist? Are they overthinking the whole thing?

Or are they adding value to the service, valuable change and meaningful discussions?

We know that many members of Ethical Panels are adhering to these standards and do have the right intentions but it is now your challenge to ensure other members no longer go unchecked.

Tweet views to @PoliceHour



Continue Reading